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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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47 results for "Lacour, Greg"
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Record #:
40574
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The profiled and pictured worship spaces, representing Islam, Greek Orthodox, Hindu, Catholic, and Jewish faith traditions, represent Charlotte’s religious diversity. The five houses of worship have at least one common mission: promoting social justice by helping to address systemic inequalities and resolve problems arising from these inequalities.
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40592
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The Evening Muse in NoDa offers a form of talk therapy that doesn’t happen in a therapist’s office. The R U OK, CLT? series combines honest dialogue about mental illness with musical and artistic performances, with the atmosphere intended to encourage individuals with mental illness to talk about their experiences.
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41195
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North Carolina’s history with barbecue goes back four centuries, which Jim Early revealed in The Best Tar Heel Barbecue, from Manteo to Murphy. This book is based largely on his experience with varieties of barbecue offered along what he calls the NCBS Historic Barbecue Trail. His experience illustrates that this dish is a key ingredient of the state’s cultural identity.
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41192
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Lacour applies the term wedge to the struggles the poor in Mecklenburg County face in finding adequate housing. Related to price and safety are factors such as the widening gap between the rich and poor in cities such as Pineville and Charlotte and dearth of economic mobility for minorities, particularly in Charlotte.
Record #:
34423
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Last year, six new members under the age of forty were appointed to the Charlotte City Council. Under an older but also first-term mayor, Vi Lyles, the diverse council is far less patient, less devoted to process, more innovative, more willing to look afresh at the way the city government operates, and unafraid to challenge the old guard. The Council is also demonstrating some of their millennial generation’s defining characteristics which embrace technology and an entrepreneurial approach.
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Record #:
34425
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Mayor Vi Lyles swept into office last year with a resounding win over her Republican opponent, Charlotte City Council member Kenny Smith, and a mandate for change that also transformed the makeup of the eleven-member council. Lyles is the city’s first black female mayor and is committed to addressing affordable housing, policing, employment, and other civic issues.
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Record #:
34433
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The Charlotte Regional Partnership has branded itself as “Charlotte USA.” The partnership’s intent is to connect companies and their job opportunities to the workforces in towns with their own distinct economies but still within the Charlotte area. While the partnership says it successfully bid and recruited twelve economic development projects in 2017, some officials wonder if the partnership is as effective as it could be, especially in light of a high-profile failure in January.
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Record #:
34440
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Moore’s Sanctuary is an African-American community in the west side of Charlotte, and its foundation has existed for 148 years. As the City of Charlotte faces a shortage in affordable and workforce housing, developers are looking to acquire property in the west side. Rickey Hall, founder of the West Side Community Land Trust, hopes to purchase land and ensure longtime west-side residents have a place to live as land values increase.
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Record #:
38171
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An interview with a former Clinton and Obama administrations housing official revealed a perception balancing optimism and realism. He suggests cities can generate progress through initiatives such as infrastructure growth from a responsible management of public assets. Progress can be assured in cities, he believes, by investing in these areas: innovation, infrastructure, and inclusion. As for the growing urban-rural divide, Katz proposes it can be overcome by intermediaries between what he called the core city and rural periphery.
Record #:
38176
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What the author called “the silver tsunami” is increasingly evident in town and metros alike, from factors such as baby boomers entering retirement. Addressing elderly-specific issues is church programs focusing on topics like dementia. Helping to improve the quality of life for impoverished elders is government programs such as Centralina Area Agency on Aging, which helps with needs like transportation. Along with church and government programs there is the Meck 60+ project, a needs assessment study calibrating the number of elderly individuals and the extent of issues and needs related to aging.
Record #:
27664
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Throughout its history, Charlotte has moved progressively forward. However, in 2016 the urban-rural divide became clearer in North Carolina and in the United States. House Bill 2 and the 2016 election both resulted in trying times for Charlotte, forcing city officials to seriously ponder how to move forward.
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Record #:
27661
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After a relative’s negative post-hospital care experience for mental health problems, Bill and Betsy Blue formed the HopeWay Foundation in 2014. HopeWay, located in Charlotte, provides services for clients who have experienced a hospital stay but still need more attention.
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Record #:
27826
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Artist Dan Nance paints historical renderings of events in the Charlotte area and has been doing so for twenty years. His collection has been reunited for the first time at the Charlotte Museum of History for an exhibit titled: “Charlotte’s Road to Revolution: Paintings by North Carolina Artist Dan Nance.”
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p138-142,144, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
28496
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In 1971, a group of college students marched to protect Crowders Mountain, a Gaston County treasure, from strip-mining. Forty-five years later, some of them reunited for a commemorative march. Thanks to these citizens’ efforts, Crowders Mountain State Park exists today for all to enjoy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 11, April 2017, p32-36, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28569
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Two Charlotte developers are about to embark on the city’s biggest development in decades, on the last large piece of undeveloped land in Mecklenburg County. The planned development is named the River District, and will be located between the Catawba River and Charlotte Douglas International Airport.
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