NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for "Godfrey, Michael A"
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
9073
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is another in the continuing series about wildlife that has “Carolina” in their common or scientific names. The eastern box turtle, or more formally, Terrapene carolina carolina, ranges from Canada through Georgia. It has been found at sea level and at elevations up to 7,000 feet.
Subject(s):
Record #:
8891
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pokeweed is a native North American plant, with North Carolina almost in the center of its natural range. Europeans discovered it only after the colonists came. As a wildlife food staple pokeweed excels. The berries ripen in late summer and last far into winter. Migratory birds benefit from them; as they begin their southward journey, they find a 1,500 mile table of pokeweed set before them. A number of mammals, such as fox, bear, raccoon, skunk, and opossum, feed on the berries.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8926
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the June 1972, issue of Wildlife in North Carolina, Godfrey described three animals with “Carolina” in their names. In this article he describes another, the mourning dove, known scientifically as Zenaidura nacroura carolinensis.
Full Text:
Record #:
8918
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several well-known animals have the word “Carolina” attached to their common or scientific names. They are the eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis, the red-bellied woodpecker (Centurus carolinus), and the Carolina wren. Godfrey describes them.
Full Text:
Record #:
9016
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this sixth of a series about wildlife species that have “Carolina” in their common or scientific name, Godfrey describes the white breasted nuthatch, or Sitta carolinensis.
Full Text:
Record #:
9019
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this seventh of a series about wildlife species that have “Carolina” in their common or scientific name, Godfrey describes the Carolina wolf spider. This large spider is unusual for two reasons: it does not spin a web to capture prey, preferring to run it down, and it is among the very few non-vertebrates which show any interest in their young other than as menu items.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9069
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smith Island is the state's most isolated coastal area and one of the last remaining wilderness areas along the Atlantic Coast. Actually, it is made up of three sub-islands, Bluff, Middle, and Bald Head. Godfrey does not dwell on the island's rich and fascinating history nor its uncertain and controversial future with proposed development on Bald Head Island. Instead he describes the incredible natural beauty of the landscape.
Full Text:
Record #:
9514
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to some rare, meat-eating plants--the Venus flytrap, sundew, bladderwort, butterwort, and pitcher plant. These plants appear in profusion in the Great Green Swamp in the southeastern corner of North Carolina.
Full Text:
Record #:
9539
Author(s):
Abstract:
Controversy swirls around the construction of the B. Everett Jordan Dam. Over 44,000 acres are involved in this U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project. Some of the finest wildlife habitat and farm land in the Piedmont, in addition to a prime whitewater stretch on the Haw River and most of New Hope Creek, are in the area. This article contains views on the building of the dam.
Source:
Full Text: