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6 results for Dams--Environmental aspects
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Record #:
4570
Author(s):
Abstract:
The destruction by the Marines of the 250-foot-long concrete Rains Mill Dam on the Little River in Johnston County will open 50 more miles of the river to fish spawning. The dam stood for 71 years and was blown up in December 1999. It is the third dam on the Little and Neuse rivers to be removed for environmental purposes since 1997. The removal will help restore the ecosystem, river system, and fisheries.
Record #:
9539
Author(s):
Abstract:
Controversy swirls around the construction of the B. Everett Jordan Dam. Over 44,000 acres are involved in this U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project. Some of the finest wildlife habitat and farm land in the Piedmont, in addition to a prime whitewater stretch on the Haw River and most of New Hope Creek, are in the area. This article contains views on the building of the dam.
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Record #:
26908
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two years ago, new rules were adopted to require dam building agencies to consider fish and wildlife needs when planning a big water project. Interior Secretary James Watt wants to rewrite those rules so that economic considerations have priority over environmental concerns. Conservationists argue that this would be a huge step backwards and pose a real threat to wildlife habitat.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 7, July 1982, p14, il
Record #:
3592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Removal of the Quaker Neck Dam on the Neuse River near Goldsboro opens up 75 miles of the river, plus tributaries, to spawning fish, including striped bass. Built in 1952, the 260-foot dam was the first one in the state removed for environmental reasons.
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Record #:
13559
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are thousands of dams of varying sizes across North Carolina that are no longer used for energy production or milling. Some advocate removing them to help restore the ecosystem, river system, recreational opportunities, and fisheries. Opponents of removal wish to preserve historic structures.
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Record #:
34230
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Abstract:
In July, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission denied a Request for a Declaratory Ruling on the validity and applicability of rules on minimum releases from dams. The request was brought by owners of small hydropower dams, who assert that they are being adversely affected by recommendations that standard minimum releases from their dams be increased.