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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 78 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 2014
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Record #:
22393
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Columbus County, Lake Waccamaw covers an area of 9,000 square acres along with 14 miles of cypress-lined shoreline. It is the third-largest natural lake in the state, but its depth only averages 3 feet. It is a place of great diversity, both in and out of the water. In the forest and swamps surrounding Waccamaw are Prothonotary warblers, black bear, pine lily, river otters, Venus flytraps, spotted turtles and brown water snakes. Also in the lake's waters there are three endemics--three small species of fish--that are found nowhere else on the planet. They are a darter, a killfish, and a silverside. Adding to the diversity, the skull of an extinct right whale 2.5 million-year-old was found in 2007.
Record #:
22391
Abstract:
There was a time when hunting was looked upon as a purely male activity, whether it was for food or sport. However, that image is changing in the state as more women are taking to the fields and forests. \"Concern about food sources, escape from stressful daily lives, and the thrill of the hunt\" are among reasons given. Statistics from the NC Wildlife Resources Commission indicate that during the last five years hunting licenses issued to women have increased to 22,000 in 2013 from under 16,000 in 2009. Four women, all young, avid, expert hunters, relate their experiences.
Subject(s):
Record #:
22392
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a unique approach to an article on birds, Lee takes a look at Shakespeare's plays and how he used birds \"to enhance his thoughts regarding superstition, tradition, the human spirit, and the beauty of nature.\" His use of birds far exceeded any of his contemporaries, either playwrights or authors. There are sixty-four kinds of birds mentioned in his combined works and they appear over six hundred times. About fifty of the birds are known to people living in the Eastern US.