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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 70 Issue 12, Dec 2006
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8346
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For one hundred years, deer hunters have come to Council, North Carolina, to commune with nature and enjoy the fellowship of other outdoorsmen at the North State Game Club. The club was founded in Bladen County in 1906 by John Council, who had founded the Council Tool Company in 1886. Both the company and the club are still in operation. The club owns and leases a little over 6,000 acres for hunting in Bladen County. However, hunting is just one small part of the fun the hunters enjoy.
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Record #:
8341
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For over fifty years, wildlife photographers Jack Dermid and Gene Hester have traveled across North Carolina in search of photographic opportunities. Dermid has a reputation for extraordinary patience in getting exactly the right shot, and Hester travels widely each year in search of waterfowl and deer. Wilson discusses the careers of these two well-known photographers.
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Record #:
8342
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The South Atlantic Fishery Management Council (SAFMC) likely will designate North Carolina's first Marine Protected Area (MPA) when it meets in March 2007 to adopt amendment 14 to the Snapper Grouper Fisheries Management Plan. The MPA, one of eight covering waters from North Carolina to the Florida Keys, is being established to protect species of the snapper grouper complex from directed fishing pressures in federal waters. The snapper grouper complex is comprised of seventy-three species, including deep-water, slow-growing species, such as snowy grouper, misty grouper, speckled hind, Warsaw grouper, golden tilefish, and blueline tilefish.
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Record #:
8343
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The North Carolina Natural Heritage Program strives to inventory and protect plants, animals, and habitats at significant natural areas, such as Rumbling Bald Mountain. The program has operated for thirty years. Lynch discusses the expert field work done by biologists and botanists that helps agencies and private groups decide on funding needed to preserve ecologically valuable places.
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