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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 69 Issue 2, Feb 2005
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Record #:
7066
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Fishing for bass during the winter months is a slow, painstaking process, and the following factors should be considered when fishing in the cold. Cooling surface waters send fish to the lower depths. Since the bass is a cold-blooded creature, falling temperatures slow down its reaction time, and it doesn't chase after a lure. Bigger lures, instead of smaller ones, work better because the fish wants the biggest meal with the least amount of effort. Hot areas in the lakes attract fish. These are produced by power plants releasing used, warmer water back into the lake. Temperatures in these hot spots can be twenty degrees higher than the rest of the lake waters.
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Record #:
7065
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Shackleford Banks is the only major North Carolina barrier island that is protected as a wilderness area and prohibits vehicles. Wild horses live on the nine-mile island. Legend says the animals are descendants of horses that survived Spanish shipwrecks. They can be documented on the island for 200 years. In 1998, Congress passed legislation requiring that the herd be at least one hundred horses and be co-managed by the National Park Service and the Foundation for Shackleford Horses. Jenkins discusses how the co-management arrangement is working.
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Record #:
7068
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North Carolina is one of the top three or four beagling states in the nation. Beagling is a field competition that tests a hound's abilities against other hounds in tracking a scent trail, in this case a rabbit trail. The rabbit always escapes and is never harmed. The state has twenty-four beagling clubs. Horan discusses what a competition involves and the differences between brace beagling and a beagle hunt competition.
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Record #:
7067
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The lampshade spider lives in North Carolina's mountains and has existed on earth for over 220 million years. It is also found in the Rocky Mountains and mountains in California. Coyle discusses this rare spider's weaponry, how its web differs from those of other spiders, and its lively sex life.
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