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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 69 Issue 12, Dec 2005
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Record #:
7514
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Coyotes are secretive and very wary animals that are active at dawn and dusk. Although they live in the state's one hundred counties, coyote sightings have been rare, but that is changing. Both coyote and human populations are increasing in North Carolina. Webber discusses the negative image the animals have, especially among rural residents, farmers, ranchers, and hunters, and ways to improve relations between the two groups.
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Record #:
7511
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North Carolina's Outer Banks have attracted hunters for over 150 years. Well into the 20th-century, the islands were dotted with lodges of gunning clubs, which have since been absorbed into national park lands. Waterfowl was the target of most of the clubs, but an introduced bird, the ring-necked pheasant, also provided sport. The only self-sustaining pheasant population in the state lives on the Outer Banks. Studies have failed to determine why they thrive there and nowhere else. The Cape Hatteras National Seashore does not allow pheasant hunting, but hunting is allowed in other island areas.
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Record #:
7512
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The native range of the ring-necked pheasant is central Asia to China. The Greeks wrote about the bird in the tenth century B.C. For centuries people have relocated the bird around the world. The first attempt in North America was in 1733, but it was not until 1881 that the first permanent colony of these pheasants was established in Oregon. The ring-necked pheasant is one of the country's most sought-after game birds. Between 1928 and 1931, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission released about 5,000 of them on the mainland, and hunting clubs on the Outer Banks released another 175 between 1931 and 1935. Wilson discusses the history of the pheasant in North Carolina.
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Record #:
7515
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Beane discusses North Carolina's second-largest frog, the river frog (Rana heckscheri). This frog is among the most poorly known in the Southeast. Albert H. Wright described it first in 1924. These frogs range from southern Mississippi to southeastern North Carolina, where the Lumber and Cape Fear River systems provided habitats. They were readily found in these river areas between 1965 and 1975. The last known river frog in the state was collected on July 12, 1975.
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