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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 69 Issue 10, Oct 2005
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7497
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Residents of Jones County had three whooping cranes winter with them from November 2004 until late March 2005, when they flew back north. The birds belong to a migratory flock that was established in Wisconsin in 2000. Historically, whooping cranes wintered along the Atlantic Coast from North Carolina to Florida. The last of the big birds reported in North Carolina was shot near Wilmington in 1875. The whooping crane, standing five feet at the head and having a seven-foot wingspan, is the tallest bird in North America. The first sighting in North Carolina was in July 1589, near Ocracoke.
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7495
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At the beginning of the 20th century, vast flocks of Canada geese wintered in North Carolina. With numbers reaching over 100,000, Lake Mattamuskeet was called the Canada goose capital of the world. In the last century, the number of migrating geese has dwindled to around 5,000 while the resident population has multiplied to over one million. Resident Canada geese are found in all one hundred counties. Migratory birds winter in northeastern North Carolina. Stable breeding habitats, few predators, and short distances to migrate contribute to the resident's population growth. Wilson presents an account of North Carolina's Canada geese from the 16th century to the present.
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Record #:
7498
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Savannas were once a common feature of the vast longleaf pine forests of the Southeast. These open, wildflower-strewn landscapes were much admired by early explorers and botanists. Their numbers are diminished today, and many have vanished altogether. Early discusses reasons for the savanna's decline and what is being done to restore and maintain existing ones. Among North Carolina's remaining savannas are the B. W. Wells Savanna (Pender County); Holly Shelter game Land (Pender County); Green Swamp Preserve (Brunswick County); and Boiling Spring Lakes Wetland Complex (Brunswick County).
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Record #:
7499
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The state's ocean and coastal fisheries are showing limited signs of progress as two stocks, striped mullet and sharks, are upgraded to recovering, as reported in a stock status report from the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries. Weakfish was downgraded to overfished, and summer flounder was moved to the concerned category. The 2005 stock report lists fish in the following categories: viable, recovering, concerned, overfished, and unknown.
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Record #:
7496
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A number of hunters use food plots to attract deer in season instead of putting bait, such as corn, apples, and sweet potatoes, on the ground. Food plots also provide nourishment year-round. Among the forage plants that provide nutrition for game animals are clover, oats, chicory, soybeans, cowpeas, chufa, turnips, and vetch.
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Record #:
7494
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Green provides some basic pointers for hunting bucks and does. These include knowing the territory where the hunt will occur; knowing the hunting law because ignorance is no excuse and can be dangerous to the hunter as well as other hunters in the field; and knowing the deer's anatomy so as to take the deer in the most humane way possible.
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