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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Canada goose
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Record #:
7495
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At the beginning of the 20th century, vast flocks of Canada geese wintered in North Carolina. With numbers reaching over 100,000, Lake Mattamuskeet was called the Canada goose capital of the world. In the last century, the number of migrating geese has dwindled to around 5,000 while the resident population has multiplied to over one million. Resident Canada geese are found in all one hundred counties. Migratory birds winter in northeastern North Carolina. Stable breeding habitats, few predators, and short distances to migrate contribute to the resident's population growth. Wilson presents an account of North Carolina's Canada geese from the 16th century to the present.
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Record #:
26655
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Last year, the North Carolina Wildlife Federation recommended that the Canada goose seasons be closed. However, some claimed that data was faulty and others didn’t believe the population was low enough to warrant closure. While debates continue, the Federation suggests a permit-only season and to hold the season as late as possible.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 3, May/June 1986, p3-8, il
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Record #:
8354
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Mrs. Hazel Ross Gaddy is seventy-three years old, and for almost half of her life, she has been looking after geese and ducks on her Ansonville farm. The farm is better known as Lockhart Gaddy's Wild Goose Refuge, which started in 1934. The refuge is small, being only 300 acres of farmland with a ten-acre pond. Each year some 12,000 to 15,000 Canada geese and wild ducks winter here. It is probably the only place in the country where visitors can observe Canada geese at really close range. The Anson County goose refuge rates a spot on each year's state highway map.
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Record #:
26807
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Short-stopping is a term used by biologists to describe changes in land-use practices which have altered the movements of Canada geese. Changes in farming practices and hunting seasons have combined to reduce drastically the number of Canada geese wintering in North Carolina.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 4, Apr 1981, p13-16, il
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