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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 54 Issue 6, June 1990
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Record #:
7978
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Coastal North Carolina is the only place on the Atlantic Coast where the piping plover both breeds and winters in significant numbers. Commercial gunning in the early 20th-century almost drove the bird to extinction, and recovery only started after shorebird hunting was regulated in 1918. Starting in the 1940s, coastal development and human activity sent the population spiraling down again. In 1986, the bird was added to the endangered species list. Current intensive management appears to be helping the plover recover.
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Record #:
7979
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Lyme disease is moving slowly from the Northeast into North Carolina. Rocky Mountain spotted fever still produces more illnesses in the state than lyme at the moment. Ticks transmit the disease, but state disease specialists have not yet identified the primary transmitter. Available evidence points to Lone Star and black-legged ticks. Both are common in the state.
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Record #:
7904
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Since 1976, North Carolina has required hunters to report their big game harvest. Game managers use this information to make decisions affecting hunting seasons, bag limits, and other regulatory matters. Report Number 14 covers the 1989-1990 hunting season and lists statistics by counties for game harvests of black bear, white-tailed deer, wild boar, and wild turkey.
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Record #:
7976
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There are at least twenty-four species of sunfish found in the state, including redear, bluegill, redbreast, warmouth, and pumpkinseed. Hester describes the fish; live or artificial bait; and equipment. A fly rod is one of the best fishing rods for catching sunfish on ponds and lakes.
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Record #:
692
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Four years have passed since fire swept 45,000 acres of the Holly Shelter Game Land in Pender County, leaving a blackened wasteland. Today, wildlife has rebounded.
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Record #:
7977
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Long before the photographic capabilities of the 20th-century developed, exploring botanists made highly specialized drawings of the species they collected. Easley discusses the work and career of botanical illustrator Linda Funk.
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