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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 38 Issue 8, Aug 1974
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Record #:
9151
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Abstract:
Eastern fox squirrels are the largest tree squirrels in the western hemisphere, weighing up to three pounds and having a body the size of a house cat. They are also strikingly colored in silver, gray, and black. This squirrel prefers open timber and small groves of nut trees or long leaf pines instead heavily forested areas. Fox squirrels are rare in North Carolina, but some sections produce enough to satisfy hunters. Still, their number had declined to such a degree in 1973-74, that the hunting season was closed on them.
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Record #:
9191
Abstract:
The 1,100-acre James Godwin Forest is the result of an attempt by James L. Goodwin, a wealthy Connecticut resident and Yale Forestry School graduate, to introduce modern forestry methods into the North Carolina Piedmont during the late 1920s. Managed by the School of Forest Resources at North Carolina State University, the forest is one of the state's oldest actively managed tree farms.
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Record #:
9152
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Abstract:
Currently, the only successfully established population of ring-necked pheasants in the Southeast is on the Outer Banks in the vicinity of Hatteras Island. The population is about forty years old, and because of the isolation of the barrier islands, the pheasants have not expanded beyond them. Connelly discusses attempts to established other pheasant populations on other game lands.
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Record #:
9150
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Abstract:
In Part 2 of this series on trout fishing and trout habitat in North Carolina, Dean discusses effects on trout produced by human activity. It takes only one sand and gravel operation, one careless timber cut, one new development, or a new road to destroy a trout stream.
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