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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 33 Issue 2, Feb 1969
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Record #:
8354
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Mrs. Hazel Ross Gaddy is seventy-three years old, and for almost half of her life, she has been looking after geese and ducks on her Ansonville farm. The farm is better known as Lockhart Gaddy's Wild Goose Refuge, which started in 1934. The refuge is small, being only 300 acres of farmland with a ten-acre pond. Each year some 12,000 to 15,000 Canada geese and wild ducks winter here. It is probably the only place in the country where visitors can observe Canada geese at really close range. The Anson County goose refuge rates a spot on each year's state highway map.
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Record #:
8351
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Gaddis looks back to a time when quality was a byword in the creation of hunting and fishing equipment, and labor costs allowed the craftsmanship necessary to sustain it. He discusses the quality that was exemplified in the guns and tackle of yesteryear. Production of higher grade guns was measured in months, and even the lesser grade field guns required several weeks of handwork. Three things that distinguished fishing lures from present-day ones were that the lures were beautifully balanced, their hardware was designed to hold the fish, and they were made of wood instead of plastic.
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Record #:
8352
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With its flat body and both eyes on one side of its head, the flounder is one of the more unusual fishes found in the state's coastal waters. It lives and feeds on the ocean bottom and averages about two or three pounds in weight. It can grow to a maximum length of four feet and weigh twenty-six pounds. For the state's commercial fishermen, the flounder is the number one money-maker among all other food finfish. It is a big favorite of sportsfishermen and especially of seafood lovers.
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Record #:
8356
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Woodcocks are unusual game birds, having short legs, pot bellies, large eyes, and long bills. They are actually seabirds that prefers to live in wet woodlands rather than along the seashore. Woodcocks migrate southward in the winter and spend the season in North Carolina and other southeastern states. The best places to look for the bird when hunting are young forest areas on poorly drained land and in alder thickets.
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Record #:
8355
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The lone species of American sassafras which is native to the eastern United States is quite common in North Carolina. It ranges in size from a shrub to a large tree, often growing to a height of over forty feet. The tree is unusual because of the variety of leaf shapes that are found on it. The twigs, bark, and roots are spicy and aromatic, and, since early times, have been acclaimed for their healing properties.
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