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3 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 30 Issue 9, Sept 1966
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Record #:
8171
Abstract:
The shrimp fishery in North Carolina began about 1880, but its actual potential was not realized until 1923 when for the first time in the state's history, over a million pounds of shrimp were landed. The landings peaked in 1953, when fourteen million pounds were landed. Since then landings have fluctuated at a lower level with slightly over five million pounds landed in 1965. The brown, spotted, and white shrimp are the important commercial species of shrimp. In this first of two articles on shrimp and shrimp research, McCoy and McKenzie discuss the shrimp's life history, migration patterns, gear and methods of harvesting, vessels used, and the shrimping season.
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Record #:
8144
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Abstract:
The black bear, the smallest of the American bears, seldom attains over five feet in length or over 500 pounds in weight. Encroaching civilization has greatly reduced the bear population in this country since the first English settlers arrived. In North Carolina the black bear population is around 5,000. North Carolina has placed the bears on the list of protected game animals to keep them from becoming extinct in the state. Amundson discusses the bear's coloration, behavior, breeding habits, food habits, enemies, management, and hunting.
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Record #:
8170
Abstract:
The Carolina pygmy rattlesnake is characterized by its small size, tiny rattle, and typical pit viper appearance. Its coloration is highly variable, running the gamut from gray to brick red. Most adult snakes measure around eighteen inches, but a few approaching two feet have been found in North Carolina. Its preferred habitat is in the Sandhills and southeastern part of the state.
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