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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for We the People of North Carolina Vol. 20 Issue 4, September 1962
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Record #:
31089
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1963 North Carolina General Assembly and state Advisory Budget Commission will face questions of policy and appropriations for public higher education operations in the coming session. With higher enrollment, proposals have been made for the creation of three additional senior colleges to be state supported and fifteen comprehensive community colleges. It is also suggested that the state and federal levels pay 65 percent while the local governments pay 15 and the student fees 20 percent.
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Record #:
31087
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a crisis confronting North Carolina higher learning, colleges in the state hope that the public and the 1963 General Assembly will be alerted to support large additional appropriations for expanding existing and new public institutions. Private institutions in the state also face the loss of voluntary contributions while facing a forced merger with governmental regulations.
Record #:
31094
Author(s):
Abstract:
It is often assumed that the cost of college education can be reduced by two-year community colleges such as the system proposed for North Carolina. Costs to the students are lower than other institutions; however, total operating costs can be substantial to the taxpayer and can only be offset by large enrollment numbers.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
31098
Author(s):
Abstract:
The faculty-student ratio is a matter of top priority and interest to college administrators. In North Carolina, with over 2500 faculty and over 33000 students enrolled, there are only 13 students per faculty member. This is below the ratio in other states, providing North Carolina students with greater one-on-one interactions.
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Record #:
31099
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earnings of full-time faculty at public and private colleges and universities in North Carolina in 1959 showed a median of $7,462 for men and $5,096 for women. The largest salaries were seen at Duke University, University of North Carolina, and the State College of U.N.C.
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Record #:
31097
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's resident supply of college graduates, increasing over 45% from 1940 to 1950 and 40% from 1950 to 1960. Unfortunately, only 40% of graduates are retained in the state, and the out-migration of college graduates to other states is consistently high.
Record #:
31105
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1960, North Carolina ranked 12th in population among the states via the Federal census. In terms of expenditures for higher education, it ranked seventh for public schools and thirteenth for private colleges. The state's combined rank was 10th, with current expense costs over $103 million.
Record #:
31109
Author(s):
Abstract:
For North Carolina, in the last decade there was great effort expended to bring about industrial and social progress. Enrollment in North Carolina colleges has substantially increased, while advances in technology and business have increased professional engagement in engineering, manufacturing, and other professional groups like lawyers and physicians.