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3 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 319, Sept/Oct 1999
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Record #:
34300
Author(s):
Abstract:
One piece of environmental legislation that failed to win approval in the 1999 session of the General Assembly was a bill aimed at correcting problems with the law establishing North Carolina’s Dry-Cleaning Solvent Cleanup Program. The major problem with the legislation is that it essentially sets up circumstances under which all dry-cleaning solvent cleanups would be funded by the State’s Dry-Cleaning Solvent Cleanup Fund but provides revenue for the fund that is far short of what will be needed. Legislative changes proposed repealing insurance requirements, but because this solution would divert money from the General Fund, the proposed legislation failed.
Record #:
34299
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that $80-$90 billion will have to be spent over the next twenty years to solve the nation’s sewer overflow problem. In July 1998, North Carolina began implementing new enforcement initiatives aimed at preventing sewer overflows. A new systemwide permit program will require sewer operators to adhere to design construction and performance standards.
Record #:
34301
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Pacific cold sea surface event called La Niña is persisting and is predicted to hold on into 2000. The longer-term climate effects in North Carolina could be a continued deficit of normal rainfall into the spring. Because La Niña increases hurricane activity in the Atlantic, the state could see increased storm activity in the fall and short-term relief from drought conditions.