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43 results for Tributaries
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Record #:
3701
Author(s):
Abstract:
The menhaden fishing industry once stretched from Maine to Florida, but now is centered in four states - Virginia, North Carolina, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The industry peaked in the state in 1956, and the sole plant still operating is in Beaufort.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p6-13, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
3917
Author(s):
Abstract:
By studying the historical geography of Beaufort Inlet, Intersal, Inc. was able to determine inlet boundaries, features, and obstacles in the 18th-century. Using this data, the firm conducted a ten-year search that discovered what is thought to be the wreck of Blackbeard's flagship QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 8, Oct 1998, p24-33, il
Record #:
5716
Author(s):
Abstract:
Camden's Moses Grandy, a waterman from the 1790s to the 1830s, wrote THE NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF MOSES GRANDY, WHO WAS A SLAVE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, the only account of maritime life in the state written by a former slave.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p6-13, f
Subject(s):
Record #:
17735
Author(s):
Abstract:
Managing fishery populations with increased demand for seafood often led to the near extinction of species. Specifically in the Pamlico Sound the diamondback terrapin was in such demand the animal was nearly driven to extinction by the early 20th-century. In northern cities of Philadelphia, Baltimore, and New York the meat was prized as a delicacy which drove profits for the state's fishermen and led to the near extinction before regulations restricted turtle harvesting.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p7-10, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17736
Author(s):
Abstract:
River navigation was invaluable during the 18th- and 19th-century throughout the state and remains an understudied aspect of maritime culture. The Dan River serves as a case study to demonstrate the range of riverine activities from canals, to fish dams, and the movement of goods and people. Dan River is a tributary of the larger Roanoke and opened a rich agricultural area for commerce.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p11-16, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dispute between Spaniards and British over the territory of North Carolina prompted several Spanish raids during the 1740s. The Spanish strategy was to cripple commerce and weaken the British colony. To do so, the Spanish attacked ports at Ocracoke Inlet, Beaufort, and Cape Fear Harbor.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p16-21, il
Record #:
17733
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the era of wooden ships trade of naval stores was indispensable but fell off with the development of non-wooden hull types. A resurgence in the demand for tar increased in the mid-19th-century because of evolving field of petrochemicals. Throughout both periods the industry thrived in the state because of the density of long-leaf pine trees, a major source of resin for tar.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p7-16, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
17732
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackfish is a type of fish considered a delicacy by New Yorkers in the early 20th-century. In Carteret County a group of Scandinavian fishermen moved to the area and brought their specially modified boats. This group of fishermen worked cooperatively and seamlessly with other fishermen and within coastal communities like Beaufort.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Oct 1991, p17-22, il
Record #:
17738
Author(s):
Abstract:
Exploration of the Cape Fear Region began in the 17th-century when prospectors recognized potential for agriculture and timber exploitation. Two men, David Williams and Henry Skibbow, purchased 100 acres of land to become Exeter or New Exeter. The area was to be formally incorporated as a town in 1754. Expectations were for Exeter to become a viable port on the Cape Fear, however, by 1770 it was excluded from customs legislation indicating failure to become a trade center.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p26-31, il
Record #:
17745
Author(s):
Abstract:
Distilling alcohol for private consumption has been regulated in the state since 1715. Complete prohibition occurred in 1908 after the passing of Watts and Ward Law. One reason distillation remained so prevalent in the northeast portion of the state is that distilling used the similar equipment as for making turpentine, an already established industry in the area. Dare County moonshiners took to distilling both because they already had the equipment and also tough economic times drove them to lucrative manufacturing and sale of alcohol.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 9, October 1999, p7-23, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17739
Abstract:
Shipbuilding was a tradition in Onslow County even before its boundaries were officially drawn in 1734. This shipbuilding tradition was not limited to small riverine craft and dugouts but included large vessels and steamboats. Swansboro was the main location for these boatbuilding endeavors constituting over half of the vessels built within the county.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 5, Oct 1995, p7-14, por
Record #:
17743
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author disputes Martin Rozear's claim that the first established hospital was in Portsmouth 1846-1847, an article that appeared in the previous issue of this journal. Watson pulls from fragmentary evidence to argue the first designed hospital was privately funded and built in Wilmington during the mid-1830s. This facility closed sometime in the late 1830s.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p41-43, il
Record #:
17742
Author(s):
Abstract:
Both the French and Spanish had success raiding commercial vessel off both of the Carolina's coast between 1739 and 1748. This privateering had disastrous effects to British shipping despite the Royal Navy positioning ships off the coast. Privateering only ended after the Treaty of Aix-la-Chappelle in 1748.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p15-30, il
Record #:
17744
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, Otway Burns successfully raided British ship in American waters. Burns commanded the Snap Dragon and often sailing from Beaufort and Swansboro with a crew of as many as 75 men. The author challenges the generally accepted figures for Burns' war time prizes and questions the credibility of sources previously used.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 8, Oct 1998, p7-17, il
Record #:
17741
Abstract:
The Carolina Aircraft Company was established March 31, 1918 in Raleigh by Harry Atwood. During World War I, the company crafted seaplanes designed by Atwood. The endeavor was short-lived due to lack of demand following the conclusion of the war.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 6, Oct 1996, p22-27, il