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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Tributaries Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992
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Record #:
1963
Author(s):
Abstract:
Life in the naval stores industry of 19th-century North Carolina is documented in a pictorial series.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p12-15, il
Record #:
1971
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many unknown travelers, explorers, and artifacts from the 1500s and 1600s lie buried off the coasts of North Carolina and other coastal states. Underwater archaeology could assist in bringing information about this period to light.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p22-25, f
Record #:
1972
Author(s):
Abstract:
A process that has been used by foresters and the timber industry is now a valuable tool in assisting historians in precisely dating old houses and maritime artifacts.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p26-29, il, f
Record #:
17734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dispute between Spaniards and British over the territory of North Carolina prompted several Spanish raids during the 1740s. The Spanish strategy was to cripple commerce and weaken the British colony. To do so, the Spanish attacked ports at Ocracoke Inlet, Beaufort, and Cape Fear Harbor.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p16-21, il
Record #:
17733
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the era of wooden ships trade of naval stores was indispensable but fell off with the development of non-wooden hull types. A resurgence in the demand for tar increased in the mid-19th-century because of evolving field of petrochemicals. Throughout both periods the industry thrived in the state because of the density of long-leaf pine trees, a major source of resin for tar.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p7-16, por
Subject(s):