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4 results for The State Vol. 7 Issue 43, Mar 1940
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Record #:
15287
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Harnett County lies a small, famous, old church called Barbecue, founded in 1757. This Presbyterian church was the pastorate of Reverend Campbell for a time until the Revolutionary War turned this Whig against his Tory congregation. Angus McDairmid next occupied the pulpit until 1802 when he tried to prevent Barbecue from being swept up in the frenzy of the Presbyterian revival; his efforts failed. Many others followed, even a Methodist preacher, and among worshipers at Barbecue were Flora McDonald and Alexander McRae.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 43, Mar 1940, p10-11, f
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Record #:
17813
Author(s):
Abstract:
Old Salem Village is home to one of the largest coffee pots in the country. Made of extra thick and heavy tin, it is sixteen feet in circumference and almost that tall. The pot stands atop an eight foot iron pole. Wagons and cars have run into it, and city officials have condemned it, but it still survives. It was erected in 1858 by Julius Mickey to advertise his tin shop.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 43, Mar 1940, p5, il
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Record #:
17814
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Bellamy was born in Wilmington in 1854. He was a graduate of Davidson College and the University of Virginia and in 1875 was admitted to the Wilmington bar. He held a number of state and national positions as a member of the Legislature and two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. He was president of the State Bar Association and counsel for a number of businesses, including Seaboard Air Line Railway and Southern Bell Telephone Company.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 43, Mar 1940, p6-7, il, por
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Record #:
17812
Author(s):
Abstract:
In another of his travel articles to various places in the state, Goerch visits Ocracoke Island, part of the Outer Banks
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 43, Mar 1940, p1-3, 20, 26, il
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