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8 results for The State Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987
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Record #:
7866
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Abstract:
Sugar Loaf is a sixty-foot-high sand dune in Carolina Beach State Park. Prior to the mid1600s, it was an area inhabited by Indians. The Europeans tried to colonize the area, but their attempts lasted only two years because of Indian hostility. The European explorer William Hilton mapped the region and named the dune Sugar Loaf because it resembled a mass of sugar. In 1725, the “Battle of Sugar Loaf” finally secured the area for the Europeans. Sugar Loaf also saw action in the Civil War because of its proximity to Fort Fisher.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p7,59, il
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Record #:
7883
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“Unto These Hills” is a popular historical pageant performed in Cherokee, North Carolina. Begun in 1950, the pageant is one of fourteen outdoor dramas in the state. California places a distant second with eight outdoor dramas. “Unto These Hills” attracted an audience of 107,000 in its first year and 151,000 by 1953. The production is so popular because it sheds light on an area of American history that is often forgotten: the forced removal of Indian tribes in the east.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p8-9, il, por
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Record #:
7889
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Sugar Hill, a suburb of Fallston, is known for its annual Easter egg fight. Participants bring anywhere from 6 dozen hard-boiled eggs to 125 dozen, sometimes more. A fight commences when one person taps his or her egg against another person's egg. When one end of an egg is cracked, it is turned over, and another attack begins. A winner is declared when both ends of a competitor's egg are cracked. The winner keeps the loser's egg and both of them move on to the next fight.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p10-11,52, il
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Record #:
7941
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Flora Watkins, wife of Squire J. C. Watkins, grew up in Cashiers, North Carolina, accustomed to aristocracy. Her husband built her a house in Dillsboro and died soon thereafter. The squire left his widow a large mortgage payment that she could not afford, so the sheriff came to sell the house at auction. Flora stayed up all night with her oldest son and wrote 150 letters to members of the Masonic Lodge. Soon enough money had been raised to convince the bank to let her keep the house. Then she opened the house to boarders at eight dollars a month for both room and board. The house remained in the family until 1983, when it was sold to become the Squire Watkins Inn, Bed, and Breakfast.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p14-15, il
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Record #:
7938
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Jewelry stores are not the only places you should look for emeralds and sapphires. Your might try your luck in the mountains of western North Carolina. You can dig on your own only two minutes from the Blue Ridge Parkway on the side of Highway 226, or stop by Ledford's Rock and Mr. Ledford will give you two buckets of dirt from across the road for ten dollars. Shake your buckets into a screened box, which allows the dirt to fall through, leaving the rocks. The box is then dipped into ice water to clean the rocks. It is a lot of hard work, but persistence pays off - literally.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p18-19, il
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Record #:
7937
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The North Carolina Association of Educators had its start in Morehead City in June 1887. Teachers stayed for two weeks at the convention, which was to provide rest and relaxation from the schoolroom. At least 1700 attended the convention the first year, of which 900 stayed at the Atlantic Hotel. Afternoons were filled with boat rides and swimming, while the evenings featured lectures from noteworthy North Carolinians, such as the governor, the president of UNC, the superintendent of public instruction, and various university professors.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p20-22, il
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Record #:
7940
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The master potter Ben Owen passed his talents on to his namesake and grandson, Ben Owen III. Ben Owen III gained national recognition at age eighteen because of his unique work with pottery, including plates, jars, pots, and vases. Owen Pottery is located in Moore County. It is one of several pottery dealers on Highway 705.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p12-13, il
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Record #:
7939
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Cartoon artist and lifelong fan Jim Scancarelli from Charlotte, is taking over the Gasoline Alley comic strip. Gasoline Alley is America's oldest cartoon strip dating back to August 24, 1919. Scancarelli took the place of Dick Moores, the former assistant to the creator, Frank King, after his death. Scancarelli was Moores's assistant for seven years.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 12, May 1987, p16-17,62, il, por
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