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3 results for The State Vol. 53 Issue 9, Feb 1986
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Record #:
8114
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chapel Hill's 'famous flower ladies' are a dying breed. In the late 1960s and early 1970s a city ordinance forced sidewalk peddlers into the alleys, but the North Carolina National Bank invited the flower ladies to move into the plaza. Rosie Bell Stone spent the past fifty years selling flowers just off Franklin Street. Her mother started the tradition in Durham about sixty years ago and eventually it spread to Chapel Hill. There used to be eighteen flower ladies working at one time, but now there are only a few. According to Rosie Stone, the flower ladies' daughters don't want to take over the tradition. The flower ladies grow the flowers themselves and have to work late and get up early. Although the number of customers have also dwindled and their buying habits have changed the flower ladies passion for selling flowers remains the same.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 53 Issue 9, Feb 1986, p10-11, por
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Record #:
8110
Author(s):
Abstract:
A commemorative plaque hangs on the East Trade Street wall of the Downtown Civic Center in Charlotte to honor the naval yard that stood there from 1862 to 1865. Although no ships were ever built there, large numbers of naval supplies and machinery were manufactured and assembled there. The largest steam hammer ever built in the south was engineered there, and a yard workman invented a machine that made perfect spheres for cannon balls and shells. Federal troops took possession of the Naval Yard in April 1865. John Wilkes repurchased the property and established the Mecklenburg Ironworks on it, but it was destroyed by fire ten years later.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 53 Issue 9, Feb 1986, p15, por
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Record #:
8112
Abstract:
Born in Cary in 1855, Walter Hines Page became a journalist, humanitarian, and educator, and was appointed ambassador to England by President Woodrow Wilson. Although Page left North Carolina in frustration after he failed to rouse North Carolinians to social reform, he continued to love the state and was buried in Aberdeen, as he requested, when he died in 1918. The English considered him the greatest ambassador to the Court of Saint James. At his death, the king and queen of England sent notes of condolence; a tablet honoring him was placed in Westminster Abby and his portrait was hung in the Dartmouth House in London, England.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 53 Issue 9, Feb 1986, p9-10, por
Full Text: