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9 results for The State Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984
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Record #:
8313
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The ambitious Archibald Yell was born in 1797 and grew up in a cabin in the wilderness near Waxhaw, North Carolina. He worked on his parents' small farm until he was sixteen, joined Andrew Jackson's army in Tennessee, and later studied law. Jackson awarded Yell with a judgeship in Arkansas and later Yell became the governor of that state. His restless nature led him to run for and win a seat in Congress in 1845, but the promise of adventure begged him to join the Volunteer Cavalry in the Mexican War. He died two years later, leaving behind five children.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p12, 13, por
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Record #:
8314
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Rock Landing, once a riverside commercial center, mushroomed from the wooded hills along the Roanoke River in Halifax County, flourished for three decades, and then died. The town grew out of a land boom created by a grant in 1812 to construct a canal that would carry river traffic around the rapids of the Roanoke River. Cadwallader Jones began selling lots of land adjacent to Buzzard Rock, proposing the name “Rock Landing” for the town. The town flourished until the 1850s, when the eroding banks of the canal and constant flooding led to its demise in the mid-1870s. Now, the town is mostly submerged under water, leaving only a remnant of the main road leading from Roanoke Landing to Halifax.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p8-10, il, por
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Record #:
8339
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The Appalachian Consortium was formed in 1971 to preserve the Appalachian mountain heritage of music, speech, literature, and traditions. The original members of the consortium were Appalachian State University, East Tennessee State University, Mars Hill College, and Lees-McRae College. The consortium now has a board of directors and five committees: administration, regional, cooperation and development, heritage and folklife, publications, and Appalachian studies. The most important accomplishment of the organization is the creation of the Appalachian Consortium Press, which has published more than twenty-five books, fueling enthusiasm for the cultural and history of the area.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p15,16, por
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Record #:
8932
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North Carolina recently became home to a cribbage national championship team. Cribbage is a card game invented by British poet, Sir John Suckling. Players use a peg board to keep score as they try to score 121 points. A player scores points by having pairs that equal fifteen or having a variety of other combinations. The National Open Cribbage Tournament was held by the American Cribbage Congress in Raleigh. Catherine Perkins of Bear Creek became the first woman cribbage champion. For her victory Perkins won $3,000.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p11-12, por
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Record #:
8934
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After World War II, Americans wanted to buy consumer goods such as automobiles. Even though buyers had the money, however, they could not immediately get a car because of great demand. That is, unless they offered a bribe to the dealer who would let them buy a showroom car. Jeter tells a story of how one Greensboro man beat the car dealers at their own game.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p18, il
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Record #:
8935
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Mabel Hicks recalls the telephone's early days. She remembers when each town had a central operator who connected the caller with their desired party, often starting up conversation for a few minutes before transferring the call. Hicks also remembers how the family divided up phone time with the children taking advantage of Wednesday church nights to talk on the “party lines.” For Hicks, the telephone has drastically changed since her childhood.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p20, il
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Record #:
8933
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In Davie County stands what could possible be North Carolina's largest tree. The poplar tree is over twenty-six feet around and is twice as tall as surrounding trees. It is estimated that the tree is over two-hundred years old. Difficult to find, the tree is located on a private farm. Hikers must traverse creeks and a swamp to find the old poplar.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p17, por
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Record #:
8936
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During the Civil War, North Carolinians found substitutes for items they could no longer buy. North Carolina produced impressive amounts of tobacco and cotton, but beyond those two products, the state relied on imported goods. These goods were cut off during the war by the Union blockade. North Carolinians made do with what they had. Billy Arthur describes some of these efforts such as boiling the dirt from smoke house floors for the salt and carving wooden shoe soles for a leather substitute.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p21
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Record #:
8937
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In 1959 Arnold Krochmal was a new park ranger in the Great Smokey Mountain National Park. It was rumored that moonshiners were active in the park. Another ranger rented a plane and found nine stills making moonshine within the park boundaries. Krochmal and his fellow rangers hiked through the forest and found one of the stills. They also spotted two men carrying burlap sacks over their shoulders. The two men fled into the woods. The rangers made no arrest but took the sacks as evidence of moonshining activity.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p22-23, por
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