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4 results for The State Vol. 50 Issue 8, Jan 1983
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Record #:
8599
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1917, the Mountain Park Hotel in Hot Springs, North Carolina, was leased to the U.S. government to be used as a prison. On June 6, 1917, just sixty days after the United States declared war on Germany, 350 German officers and 50 seamen were brought to the hotel. Soon after, these numbers grew to 517 officers and 2,300 seamen. After a prisoner escaped, towers were built to protect the prison. These towers were manned by U.S. Army guards. The government provided nutritional meals, including meat, twice a day. The prisoners bought fruit and vegetables from Hot Springs's growers. Exercise, including tennis, bowling, and swimming, was required for the prisoners. Once called “the prison from which no one wanted to escape,” the Hot Springs prison hosted regular concerts on Thursday and Saturday nights. An epidemic broke out in the prison in 1918 and prisoners who survived were moved to Fort Oglethorpe in South Carolina. The Mountain Park Hotel then operated as a hospital for American soldiers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 8, Jan 1983, p18-19, 55, por
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Record #:
8600
Abstract:
Wallace Wade, former Duke University football coach, auctioned his special 1942 Rose Bowl trophy for $10,000 to support children's cancer research. To win the trophy at auction and keep it at Duke, Dr. Lenox Baker, professor of orthopedic surgery at Duke, led the Baker Syndicate, a group of about fifty students, alumni, and parents. Each of the fifty bid $100. The other half of the $10,000 bid was made by Harold Mayer, former chairman of the board of Oscar Mayer and Co. The trophy recalls a special time in history. In 1942, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Rose Bowl was moved from Pasadena, California, to Duke's stadium for safety reasons. This moved occurred just three weeks before the tournament was scheduled to take place. Even though Duke lost the game to Oregon State, Coach Wade was presented with a special trophy for organizing the event on such short notice. The trophy is now housed in the Duke Hall of Fame in Cameron Indoor Stadium.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 8, Jan 1983, p22, il, por
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Record #:
8598
Abstract:
In 1981, an eagle-hacking project began at Pisgah National Forest in western North Carolina. This project was designed to raise golden eagles in a state of “partial freedom” so as to prepare them for eventual release into the wild. The birds come from an Eagle Propagation Project in St. Louis, Missouri, where they are artificially bred from injured or disabled eagles. The offspring are kept in hacking cages, large, open cages with stick nests, at nearby mountain balds. A bald is a grassy mountain-top area free of large vegetation. Birds are remotely fed so that they do not form human attachments and are released into the wild at eight weeks of age. It is believed that in three or four years, they will return to where they were raised to mate. Released birds are equipped with transmitters so that researchers can track them. The mortality rate of golden eagles in the wild is 60 percent. Of the eight birds released since the project began, five are most likely still alive.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 8, Jan 1983, p16-17, il
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Record #:
8597
Author(s):
Abstract:
County-by-county listing of good news from 1982 includes awards won and new buildings or renovations begun or completed. The first phase of the $1 million Pinebridge recreation-amusement-shopping complex in Spruce Pine in Mitchell County opened to the public and a Christmas tree from Ashe County was selected for the Blue Room of the White House.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 8, Jan 1983, p8-10, 25-30, 32-51, il, por
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