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4 results for The State Vol. 50 Issue 5, Oct 1982
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Record #:
8567
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In 1770, Captain John Collet's map of North Carolina showed a string of ordinaries from the Chowan River to the Yadkin River. An ordinary was a commercial building serving to satiate travelers during colonial times. By 1800, the term “ordinary” was replaced by “tavern,” to mean a place catering to social drinking, and later by “inn” as taverns began to provide overnight accommodations. Many businesses that were run by farmers, however, remained taverns due to a lack of space for lodging. Taverns sprang up every few miles in the towns of the colonial period and thrived until the train became the popular means of transportation. The Halifax ordinary, “Sign of the Thistle,” is where both the Halifax Resolves and the North Carolina Constitution were written over tankards of ale. Minstrels visiting the area came to entertain clientele. The building was remodeled and later called Eagle Hotel. The Marquis de Lafayette spent the night there on February 27, 1825. Both Andrew Jackson and James K. Polk visited another tavern, the York Tavern, in Rockford, North Carolina. By the end of the 1800s, the railroad had laid tracks in North Carolina and most of the taverns fell into disuse.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 5, Oct 1982, p16-18, il
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Record #:
8566
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The John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown is known primarily for its instruction in handcrafts, particularly wood-carving. Campbell went to college in Massachusetts and worked as a teacher in Alabama and Tennessee, and later served as president of Piedmont College in North Georgia. His work in rural Southern communities convinced him that schools were not preparing students to remain in their communities. While traveling through western North Carolina with his wife, Campbell heard about folk schools in Denmark and came to believe an adaptation of these schools would work well in the Southern mountains. Campbell died suddenly in 1919 but his wife continued his work, visiting the schools in Denmark and other European countries and locating a site on which to build his school. Brasstown was chosen and a merchant there, Fred O. Scroggs, gave ninety acres of land including a farmhouse which is still in use today.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 5, Oct 1982, p11-13, il, por
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Record #:
8568
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Standing in the mountains of Highland, North Carolina, are what appear to be the ruins of an old Grecian temple –- four stone Doric columns. The stone columns were molded in Chicago in 1902 with the same method used by the Romans in 200 B.C. and sent by railway to Gainesville in 1908. They were intended as a gift for the entrance of the First Baptist Church of Gainesville, GA, being built at that time. The church was destroyed by fire in 1960 but only one of the columns was damaged. The columns switched hands a few times and were finally bought by Brevard Williams, an artistic designer with a Highland shop, who had them moved to his estate in 1960 and built the four column monument seen today. At the time of erection, he poured a concrete tablet and inscribed on it in Greek letters “To The Glory of God.” Brevard Williams is buried at the foot of his monument.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 5, Oct 1982, p20-21, il
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Record #:
8565
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Abstract:
Riddles Knob is supposedly haunted by Captain William Riddle, a Tory hanged in 1781 by Colonel Ben Cleveland at Tory Tree in Wilkesboro. During the American Revolution, North Carolinians were divided in their loyalties. In western North Carolina, neighbor fought against neighbor until the Tories were defeated and taken prisoner by the Patriots. Acting under a North Carolina law, Colonel Cleveland summoned a jury to try the accused men and all were quickly found guilty and sentenced to death by hanging. Colonel Cleveland then took his volunteer militia through the New River valley hanging more Tory leaders including Captain William Riddle.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 5, Oct 1982, p8-10, il
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