NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for The State Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
8623
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born on June 27, 1864, Varina Anne “Winnie” Davis was the sixth and last child of Confederate president Jefferson Davis. Tutored by a governess until she was thirteen, Winnie spent four years at a boarding school in Germany, where she learned to speak both German and French fluently. In 1881, her parents brought her back to America to live with them in Beauvoir (now Biloxi), Mississippi. Winnie was publicly christened the Daughter of the Confederacy at a veteran's rally in spring of 1886. Because of disapproval from both her father and the South, she broke her engagement to a Yankee lawyer in 1888. After her father's death, Winnie and her mother moved to New York in order for both of them to write. Winnie published two novels and died on September 18, 1898.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983, p22-23, 29, por
Full Text:
Record #:
8621
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1847, plantation owner John Haughton had his slaves build St. Mark's chapel on his property in Chatham County. Haughton moved from Tyrrell County to Chatham County in 1837 and bought all of the land that is the present-day town of Gulf. A funeral in 1934 was the last service conducted in the church while it was in the town of Gulf. St Mark's was moved to Siler City and reconsecrated in 1957. A small white church, St Mark's was moved to Raleigh's Mordecai Historic Park in 1980 where it remains today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983, p14-15, 29, il
Full Text:
Record #:
8622
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1959, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax unit raided a moonshine still just outside Franklinton. The ATTU dumped thousands of gallons of finished whiskey into a little stream near the factory without realizing it emptied into the town's drinking water reservoir. Although many residents complained about the taste and odor of their water, there were no other adverse side effects to the spill. The smell and taste cleared up after several days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983, p20-22, il
Full Text:
Record #:
8620
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stationed off the Outer Banks in 1861, the WARREN WINSLOW captured four enemy ships. The WINSLOW's history is detailed in this article.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983, p8-10, il, por, f
Full Text:
Record #:
8624
Author(s):
Abstract:
Industrialist John Motley Morehead wanted to do something special and educational for North Carolina children. In 1949, he gave the state the Morehead Planetarium in Chapel Hill. At the planetarium, celestial recognition and stellar navigation training was given to all of the American astronauts in the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and Apollo-Soyuz missions. In 1969, during its installation, Neil Armstrong inaugurated the planetarium's projector, the Zeiss Model VI Projector, which is used for indoor stargazing. In 1974, NASA struck a commemorative medal marking the planetarium's significance in space research. The medal features both the planetarium's building and its Zeiss projector.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983, p24, il
Full Text: