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9 results for The State Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982
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Record #:
8741
Abstract:
A satirical mezzotint depicting the Edenton Tea Party of 1774 was found at a shoemaker's shop in Ciudadela in 1826. In 1774, a group of fifty-one Edenton women gathered and signed a resolution against drinking tea. News of their tea party spread to London where the mezzotint was made, probably by artist Philip Dawe. Over the years, the mezzotint was shattered and only two-thirds of it has been successfully restored. It once again disappeared, but, years later, it was rediscovered by William Easterling in his bank in Edenton.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p16-18, il
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Record #:
8737
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Civil War governor, Zebulon Baird Vance, was born in Reems Creek Valley outside Asheville in 1830. The Vance Birthplace was built around 1795, and has been a state historic site for twenty years. The outer walls of the main log house have been reconstructed, but most of the interior of the house is original. There are also six log outbuildings on the site. The house has workshops for students and teachers, including how to dip candles, cook over an open fire, and hand weave.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p9-10, il
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Record #:
8740
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The Dietary Rehabilitation Clinic of Duke University is just one of four diet centers in Durham. Only two of the centers are associated with Duke Hospital. The four centers result in an estimated $25 to $30 million in revenue for the city. This means businesses in the area, including clothing stores, apartment complexes, and malls, are also seeing increased profits from visiting dieters. Celebrities, such as Elizabeth Taylor, and Buddy Hackett, have visited the diet centers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p14-15, il
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Record #:
8738
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During 1865, Governor Zeb Vance admitted it was impossible to continue to carry out his gubernatorial duties in Raleigh. He moved to Statesville that spring, but was arrested at his home on May 12, 1865 by Federalist forces. Because Vance was not involved in the profiteering common in the state at that time, the house is humble and hardly a mansion. The house is now a museum in honor of Vance and is open to the public.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
8739
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William Sydney Porter, known as O. Henry, was born in Greensboro in 1862. Most of his stories were set in the south, and a recurrent theme in his tales was the old south versus the new south. Full of humor, satire, and stereotypes, several of O. Henry's stories are autobiographical and set in the Catskills. O. Henry died in 1910 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Asheville, not far from Thomas Wolfe.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p13, por
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Record #:
8743
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Lula Vollmer was born in Keyser. She moved to New York in her early 20s and wrote plays about Asheville. SUN-UP was first produced by the Provincetown Players in 1923, and eventually opened in London, Amsterdam, and Paris. By the 1930s, Lula was writing three successful radio serials. Later, she wrote short stories for the SATURDAY EVENING POST and COLLIERS. She died on May 2, 1955 in New York.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p21-22, por
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Record #:
8742
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The Cherokee Indian Hospital in Cherokee provides free medical services to all Qualla tribe members. Built in 1981, the single story structure cost $12 million to build. Although the hospital incorporates many modern treatments, traditional healing, characteristic of the Cherokee culture, is used here as well.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p19, il
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Record #:
8744
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Around the turn of the century, many North Carolinians vacationed at one of several hotels built near mineral springs in the sandhills. Constructed in 1850, Ellerbe Springs Hotel, now Ellerbe Springs Restaurant, is the only hotel still in operation. Built by a South Carolina plantation owner, the hotel was sold to T. C. Leak after the Civil War. During World War II, the building was leased to the U.S. Government to train women in communications, and was visited by Eleanor Roosevelt. Currently, Harris M. McRae and Robert A. Henderson own the hotel and run a successful restaurant out of it.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p22-23, il
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Record #:
8745
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Dr. Boyce Griggs, inspired by a similar church in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, gathered local building experts and, together with donations, built a small church in Lincoln. Dedicated on June 20, 1981, the Little Country Church offers peace and comfort to those who seek it. There is no charge to use the church, and it is registered with the Internal Revenue Service as a nonprofit enterprise. Dr. Griggs says people continue to contribute money to the church, and all debt incurred during its construction is nearly paid off.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p24-25, il, por
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