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9 results for The State Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979
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Record #:
9055
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Abstract:
The original boundary line between North and South Carolina was established in 1735. Because of confusion between the states about the exact location of the line, it was re-drawn in 1928 by George Syme of North Carolina and Monroe Johnson of South Carolina. Using evidence found near the boundary, the two were able to recover the original line. Eight-inch granite posts serve as markers along the boundary, set at two mile intervals.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p10-13, il, por
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Record #:
9058
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This article presents a letter from W.H. Pleasants, Mayor of Louisburg at the end of the Civil War, to General W.T. Sherman. Two men, Ellis Malone and Jones Fuller, were selected by the Louisburg Board of Commissioners to go to Raleigh and deliver the letter. They received Sherman's reply which is also printed in this article.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p20
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Record #:
9061
Abstract:
The American Dance Festival had been held at Connecticut College until 1978 when it was moved to Duke University's Page Auditorium. The festival includes six weeks of public performances, but also hosts workshops and a school. Dancers of college and post-college age will see if they can become a part of the professional dance environment. This year's festival will be held between June 17 and July 28.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p24-25, il
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Record #:
9059
Abstract:
This article includes a reproduction of entries from Anna Long Thomas Fuller's diary from April 15 to May 2, 1865, that describe the surrender of Louisburg. Fuller was the wife of Jones Fuller and mother to poet and author, Edwin Wiley Fuller, and Anna. R. Fuller Malone.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p20-22, il
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Record #:
9062
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Mrs. Hill Wood of Randolph County spent much of her later life making baskets out of cornbeads grown beside her garden. People from surrounding counties came and bought her handicrafts, ranging from decorative pieces to fruit baskets, thus providing her only source of income. Neighborhood children tended to her chores, allowing her more time to hone her craft.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p26, il
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Record #:
9056
Author(s):
Abstract:
Johnston County native, Pamela Barefoot, recently published a book entitled “Mules and Memories, a Photo Documentary of the Tobacco Farmer.” Upon quitting her counseling job in Richmond, Virginia, Barefoot, who came from a family of tobacco farmers, spent the next eighteen months compiling photos for the book. In 1972, she graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University, but photography was merely as a hobby at that time.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p15-17, il, por
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Record #:
9057
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Abstract:
Novelist James Byrd's mansion in Southern Pines, known as Weymouth, was recently purchased by a group of restoration enthusiasts. Environmentalists, naturalists, and literary organizations have all lent support to the restoration project. Upon completion, a committee of writers will selects prominent poets and writers to be awarded Weymouth Fellowships and attend retreats at the mansion.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p18-19, il, por
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Record #:
9060
Abstract:
The Appalachian Boomerang is a recurring legend in much of North Carolina mountain folklore. Several stories exist regarding the origins of the boomerang including that it comes from Australia, and that it was invented by Daniel Boomer. It was used primarily for hunting raccoon.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p22-23, il
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Record #:
9063
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Abstract:
Currituck Sound is great for bass fishing, but also offers scenic views. A wide variety of life is supported by the marshlands, and there is enough salt in the water for several saltwater fish to survive. The Sound is perfect for fishing because of its shallow, weedy waters. However peaceful most of the time, the Sound is one of the most dangerous inland waterways in the country during a storm.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p27-28, il
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