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4 results for The State Vol. 36 Issue 19, Mar 1969
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Record #:
10812
Abstract:
Folk artist Minnie Evans, a long time employee of Airlie Gardens in Wilmington, has had her drawings exhibited in New York City four times. Her work, done mostly in crayon or colored pencil, is of her own original style, though it has been stated that her drawings suggest the manner of the Swiss artist Klee. In general, she is a surrealist, rarely attempting to define the actuality of a person or scene, but instead reveling in an elaborate, swirling, vividly colored pattern of metaphorical suggestion.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 19, Mar 1969, p16-17, il, por
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Record #:
10811
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Abstract:
Millions of visitors have strolled through Fort Macon, located on Bogue Banks across from Beaufort and Morehead City. But few visitors know the details of the fort's fall to Union General Ambrose Burnside on Friday, April 25, 1862. This article contains an account of the battle given by an unnamed correspondent for the NEW YORK TIMES, an eye-witness to the attack, reprinted in its entirety as it appeared in the paper.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 19, Mar 1969, p15, 26, il
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Record #:
10809
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February of 1750, a fleet of five Spanish ships heavily loaded with silver and spices sailed from Veracruz, the collection point of the Spanish Empire in the New World, to Havana. From there, the ships were to sail for Europe, but were instead wrecked by gale force winds along the coast of North Carolina. The EL SALVADOR, the NEUSTRA SIGNORA DE SOLEDAD, and three unnamed vessels were lost at various points on the Carolina coast, ranging from Topsail Island, to Ocracoke, Hatteras, and New Currituck Inlet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 19, Mar 1969, p11-12, il
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Record #:
10810
Author(s):
Abstract:
In California, barbecue is considered a verb, or something that one would do. In North Carolina, the author's home state, barbecue is a noun, or something that one would eat. In California, and other places outside of the South, barbecue is a flavor, a smoke, or a sauce; barbecuing is something done on a spit or over open coals. Down South, barbecue is a thing, a finished product ready to be eaten: crisp bits of pork that have been slow roasted over an open fire, basted with sauce, and usually served with cole slaw and corn bread.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 19, Mar 1969, p14, il
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