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7 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961
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Record #:
12698
Abstract:
The Gerber Company in Buncombe County is a good example of the kind of industry which stimulates benefits for people unfamiliar with the plant. Providing a handsome payroll for county residents, the factory is already using approximately 3,500 tons of North Carolina vegetables, and 3,000 tons of fruit. Packing from 2,500,000 to 3,000,000 containers of baby food per week, Gerber furnishes employment to an average of 350 men and women from the Asheville and Hendersonville areas, with a payroll over $1,000,000 annually.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p10, 24, il
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Record #:
12697
Author(s):
Abstract:
The historic hurricane of 1893 was one of the most destructive to hit the North Carolina coast, followed by tales of bravery and heroism throughout the state. Possibly one of the most incredible follows the exploits of Dunbar Davis, keeper of the Oak Island Life Guard Station at Ft. Caswell. Dunbar's story, related in David Stick's Graveyard of the Atlantic, tells of his rescue of the crews of five wrecked ships, working for three days without sleep, and hardly any food or water.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p9, por
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Record #:
12695
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Abstract:
The first shocks of an earthquake shook Bald Mountain in North Carolina on February 10, 1874. For weeks following, area residents were convinced that Bald Mountain was in fact a volcano, spurring a plethora of newspaper accounts, and eventually bringing forth an engineer from South Carolina to investigate. Relieving the fears of local residents, the engineer stated positively the event was an earthquake, and the \"Old Baldy,\" would do little more than rumble and was not a volcano.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p15-18, il
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Record #:
12717
Abstract:
During early autumn, it is the time for the Tar Heel hunters to ready themselves for annual safaris into the tidelands for clapper rails or \"marsh hens.\" The importance of wind and tide in marsh hunting can't be overestimated, as it takes good \"grass covering\" high water to flush out the prey in order to find and shoot them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p11, 24, por
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Record #:
13442
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first shocks of an earthquake shook Bald Mountain in North Carolina on February 10, 1874. For weeks following, area residents were convinced that Bald Mountain was in fact a volcano, spurring a plethora of newspaper accounts, and eventually bringing forth an engineer from South Carolina to investigate. Relieving the fears of local residents, the engineer stated positively the event was an earthquake, and the \"Old Baldy,\" would do little more than rumble and was not a volcano.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p15-18, il
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Record #:
13443
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville's new and unusual visitor attraction, the Colburn Mineral Museum, was started with the collection of the late Burnham S. Colburn totaling over 500 pieces. Now housing more than 2,000 minerals, the collection features many stones native to North Carolina, including Hiddenite, a rare mineral found only in Alexandria County. Among the oddities of stones is a piece of flexible sandstone able to bend at an angle.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p28-29
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Record #:
13444
Abstract:
Finding historical information on North Carolina can be time consuming, and challenging. To assist in the search for research materials, the State Department of Archives and History has published pamphlets and books on the history of North Carolina, designed with the student in mind. The pamphlets tell the story of various aspects of the state's history, with pictures in several publications available for cut out and pasting in scrapbooks.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Oct 1961, p13, 24, il
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