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4 results for The State Vol. 27 Issue 7, Sept 1959
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Record #:
12886
Author(s):
Abstract:
Encompassing 517 square miles as well as mountain ranges, highland plateaus, river valleys, and at least 44 peaks at or exceeding 4,000 feet in height, Macon County is a historic region subjected to extensive changes throughout the past four centuries. Numerous explorers and military personal have visited the region, the earliest of which was the Moore Expedition of 1715. Although plagued by elevated levels of turmoil during the American Revolution, Macon residents rebounded through successful industry that includes, agricultural farming, lumbering, pulpwood production, textiles, saw mills, and mining.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 7, Sept 1959, p8-11, 19-26, il, map
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Record #:
12887
Abstract:
Located in the Southern Appalachians, in Macon County, the Highlands Biological Station, parented by the Highlands Museum of Natural History, served to supplement the western part of the state as a facility for educational institutions. First used in 1931, the biological station expanded in 1958 with funds obtained from the National Science Foundation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 7, Sept 1959, p15, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12885
Abstract:
Rich in minerals and a popular spot for rock hunters since 1872, Macon County is home to several mines. Brooks Mine, Bowers Mine, Corundum Hill Mine, and the Mason Branch Mine, have been sources of rubies, chromite, copper, emory, graphite, schist, kaolin, and kyanite.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 7, Sept 1959, p14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
12888
Author(s):
Abstract:
The visit of William Bartram in 1776 to Western North Carolina was recorded in his book, Travels. In this installment, The State picks up Bartram as he passed from Georgia to North Carolina, via the valley of the Little Tennessee, currently known as Macon County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 7, Sept 1959, p17-18, map
Full Text: