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9 results for The State Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952
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Record #:
13774
Author(s):
Abstract:
The restoration of Old Salem in Forsyth County is the most elaborate historical project in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p3-4, f
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Record #:
13788
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quite a number of people are of the opinion that Fuquay Springs is the fastest growing town in North Carolina, and folks who live there agree.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p3-5, 23-29, f
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Record #:
13789
Author(s):
Abstract:
Around Andrew Johnson's career in his native North Carolina clings a deep fog of misconception, myth and obscurity clouds the early lives of few, if any, other presidents.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p6-7, 29-30, il, f
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Record #:
13783
Author(s):
Abstract:
Young William Tryon's letters indicate that perhaps his gift of a North Carolina panther moved the King of England to approve his plans for the New Bern Capitol building.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p8, 24, il
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Record #:
13784
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Tar Heel author enjoys the ghosts, wasps, and tourists which infest the old Guilford battleground home.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p3, 12, f
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Record #:
13785
Author(s):
Abstract:
Highlands is high up and one of North Carolina's most unusual communities.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p14-16, f
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Record #:
13791
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first colonists to invade Montgomery County were not English or Scotch or even white people. They were Indians. Long before Raleigh's colonists sailed for America, a group from the south, probably Creeks, felt impelled to leave their homeland too.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p12-13, f
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Record #:
13790
Author(s):
Abstract:
It irritates Betty Smith, author of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, for people to think she's from Brooklyn or anywhere else but Chapel Hill.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p9, f
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Record #:
13792
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although cockfighting is illegal in North Carolina, raising the fighters is not.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 48, Apr 1952, p20, f
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