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5 results for The State Vol. 12 Issue 52, May 1945
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Record #:
32946
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Abstract:
They were our first “improved” highways and were the forerunners of our modern (1945) highway transportation system in North Carolina. This article takes a look at and old contract from the Fayetteville and Western Plank Road Company for the construction of a seven mile stretch or road in Randolph County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 52, May 1945, p9, 20
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Record #:
32945
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author gives his account of a 16 mile bus ride from Ashville to Beech, NC. There to do a story on a number of summer camps, Arnold found a story in the accommodating bus driver that the community relies on to go the extra mile.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 52, May 1945, p6, 16
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Record #:
32944
Author(s):
Abstract:
As North Carolina and the National Park Service attempt to push forward with plans to create the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, plans are halted after four oil companies lease the federal land along the outer banks for oil exploration.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 52, May 1945, p4-5
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Record #:
32943
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some individuals are of the opinion that the state was named for Charles IX, of France. The best authorities, however, are agreed that Charles I of England deserves this distinction.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 52, May 1945, p1, 16
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Record #:
32969
Author(s):
Abstract:
All the land of the Carolinas from the Atlantic to the Pacific was granted to Eight English noblemen, whose names are still reflected in current place names. When the land didn’t produce as much profit as desired, all but one, John, Lord Carteret, returned their land interest to the crown for 2,500 pounds. John was later appointed Earl of Granville; and both names are still present in the form of counties.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 52, May 1945, p17
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