NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for The State Vol. 11 Issue 37, Feb 1944
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
14926
Author(s):
Abstract:
Female marines increased in numbers during World War II. These trained women were not sent abroad to fight but remained at home. Women filled positions at home so men could be relieved of duties on American bases to free-up fighting men. The women were sent to Camp Lejeune to receive training. Afterwards these marines filled traditional female roles (stenographers, telephone operators, etc.) but also began to be placed as carpenters, painters, welders, and more masculine vocations.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 37, Feb 1944, p32-33
Full Text:
Record #:
19323
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grant recounts the life of L. A. \"Speed\" Riggs, the well-known tobacco auctioneer from Goldsboro. He was probably the fastest speaking person in the country, and it was his machine-gun tongue that helped him on his rise to fame. He was selling tobacco when he was spotted by officials of the American Tobacco Company who decided he was the person for the Lucky Strike trademark. For the past seven years he has been in New York during his auctioneering of Lucky Strike cigarettes on a number of coast-to-coast radio programs.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 37, Feb 1944, p1, 29, por
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
19340
Author(s):
Abstract:
Catawba County has an ideal balance between industry and agriculture. Major towns in the county are Hickory, Newton, Conover, Maiden, and Catawba. Each of the towns is industrial in nature, and each is surrounded by rich farming regions. Agriculturally, the county has grown to be one of diversified crops and has become a pioneer in the dairy industry, especially in the Jersey division.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 37, Feb 1944, p16-28, il
Full Text:
Record #:
19339
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lawrence reviews some of the common laws which the new nation and its states adopted from England. When the State and Federal Constitutions were adopted, there were more than fifty offenses punishable by death in North Carolina. The pillory, stocks, and whipping post were also in common use. Tongue slitting, branding, and ear croppings were frequent.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 37, Feb 1944, p9, 29
Subject(s):
Full Text: