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4 results for The State Vol. 11 Issue 34, Jan 1944
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Record #:
14924
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Abstract:
In 1943, the production and sale of homemade corn liquor increased greatly compared to neighboring states. Agents for the Alcohol Tax Unit and Bureau of Internal Revenue cited the following causes: \"1. The High tax on legal whiskey with attendant high retail price. 2. The growing scarcity of legal fire-water. 3. The attractive prices illegal stuff is bringing-$17 a gallon and up.\" Bootleggers used granulated sugar mash, molasses, corn meal, and syrup to brew their illegal potion.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 34, Jan 1944, p1, 26, il
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Record #:
19294
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Abstract:
Wilkes County was formed in 1777. It is a land of mountains, large agricultural development, and industry. There are over 5,600 farms that grow principal crops of corn, tobacco, Irish potatoes and sweet potatoes on approximately 67,000 harvested acres from an available acreage of 372,000. The county has large mineral deposits. The Coble Dairy Products Company manufactures thirty different kinds of dairy products. The county produces millions of dozens of eggs each year and is known far and wide for its production of pure sourwood honey.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 34, Jan 1944, p18-24, il
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Record #:
19292
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Abstract:
While the state's moonshiners haven't been very active for a while, the practice is beginning to pick up. Sprinkle has found some interesting statistics relative to the increase in illicit distilling throughout the state and other states in this area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 34, Jan 1944, p1, 26, il
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Record #:
19293
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lawrence relates interesting information about railroading in North Carolina from the crude wood-burning trains of a century ago to the efficient rail transportation of today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 34, Jan 1944, p6, 16, il
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