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6 results for The State Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943
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Record #:
15014
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Abstract:
The Indians of western North Carolina had many beliefs which they offered in explanation of the things they did not fully understand. For example, according to the Cherokee it was animal-magic that created the mountains and thunder took the form of spirits known as Thunderers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p6, 17, f
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Record #:
15009
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Abstract:
General Thomas Clingman was the first to explore the Great Craggies, noted for their scenic beauty - and their inaccessibility. During recent years they have had few visitors, other than nearby residents, but today, by foot or on horseback, visitors arrive in droves, especially during rhododendron season.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p1-2, f
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Record #:
15015
Abstract:
Any town having fifty manufacturing establishments, including cotton mills and tobacco markets, employing 5,000 men and women with an annual payroll of $5,000,000 has a right to boast of being industrially progressive - Rocky Mount in Nash County does just that.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p12-17, f
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Record #:
15010
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Abstract:
Peace College, established in 1857 in Raleigh, had its inception in the ardent wish of outstanding Presbyterians to establish a high ranking educational institution for the education of young women.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p5, 20, 23, f
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Record #:
18984
Abstract:
Rocky Mount sits astride the line dividing Nash and Edgecombe counties. Industry has played a major part in its development with over fifty manufacturing facilities, a workforce of 5,000, and an annual payroll of $5 million. The Rocky Mount Mills is the second oldest in the state. The mill has been in operation for the last 125 years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p12-17, il
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Record #:
18983
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the Great Seal was authorized by the State Constitution, North Carolina has been slow to add other official emblems. The flag was not adopted until 1885, the state motto until 1893, the state song in 1927, and the state flower in 1941. The Carolina chickadee became the state bird in 1931 by an act of the General Assembly, but the act was repealed seven days later. Finally in March 1943, the cardinal was named the official state bird.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p7, 17
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