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5 results for State birds--North Carolina
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Record #:
13331
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's greatest game bird, the Ruffed Grouse, also referred to as a pheasant, is a forest dwelling creature considered to be the state's most omnivorous fowl. The second in a two part series published by the state, Tom Alexander examines attributes and characteristics of this unpredictable bird. The first installment may be found in the January 1955 issue, Volume 22, Number 16, pages 13-14, 36.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 17, Jan 1955, p8, 10
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Record #:
13327
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's greatest game bird, the Ruffed Grouse, also referred to as a pheasant, is a forest dwelling creature considered to be the state's most omnivorous fowl. The first of a two part series published by the state, Tom Alexander examines attributes and characteristics of this unpredictable bird.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 16, Jan 1955, p13-14, 36, il
Full Text:
Record #:
13827
Abstract:
Selected on 4 March, 1943, for their abundance, color, singing abilities and tendency to remain in the state year round, the Cardinal became the state bird of North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 31, Jan 1953, p73, il
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Record #:
14611
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lawrence tells about the origin of North Carolina's state flag, great seal and also the legislation which brought about the adoption of a state flower and state bird.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 46, Apr 1946, p8, 18-19, il
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Record #:
18983
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the Great Seal was authorized by the State Constitution, North Carolina has been slow to add other official emblems. The flag was not adopted until 1885, the state motto until 1893, the state song in 1927, and the state flower in 1941. The Carolina chickadee became the state bird in 1931 by an act of the General Assembly, but the act was repealed seven days later. Finally in March 1943, the cardinal was named the official state bird.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 43, Mar 1943, p7, 17
Full Text: