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4 results for The Palace Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016
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Record #:
37382
Abstract:
An exploration revealed its many purposes since 1784. Home for John Stanly Wright's family until the Civil War, it was General Burnside’s New Bern headquarters and a convent for the Sisters of Mercy through 1884. Heirs of James Bryan owned the house until 1932, when it was sold to the New Bern Library Association. The house was the town’s library for three decades before Tryon Palace Commission purchased the building, restored its Georgian style, and moved it to its current location, George Street.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p6-8
Record #:
37385
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Tryons’ collection of books, which functioned as a library for the community’s upper classes, is a visit-worthy aspect for tours. Of the seven books described, three include photos, notably the reproduced likeness of Jonathan Swift’s The Works of Dr. Swift, Dean of St. Patrick’s, Dublin, Volume III” (1768). Other noteworthy aspects of the collection include books reflecting Mary Tryon’s interest in military history, unusual for that time’s upper-class women.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p24-26
Record #:
37383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Why the capital shifted from New Bern was for a practical and typical two-fold reason. Because of the amount of time it took to travel in the 1700s, the state’s capital was best located in the center of wherever the population was the densest. This factor left Fayetteville as a prospective place before Raleigh was selected.
Source:
Record #:
37384
Author(s):
Abstract:
18th and 19th were work tables were gender-bound, based on the typed of work done. Other purposes expanded the types of work beyond sewing, such as writing. Moving them out into other areas of the home justified features such as fancy veneer, seen in the pictured work table that is an exemplary example of conservation labor.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 2015/2016, p18-19