NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Tar Heel Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
29260
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Redford Williams, a researcher and professor of psychiatry at Duke Medical School, is studying personality stereotypes to determine the physiological ramifications of stressful behavior patterns. Type A behavior patterns, such as competitiveness and aggression, have been related to increased coronary disease.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p17-18, por
Record #:
29259
Abstract:
For many North Carolina homeowners, the use of wood instead of fossil fuels is a simple, old-fashioned, yet innovative way to beat rising energy prices. This article describes various types of woodstoves and the best available woods in North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p14-16, por
Record #:
29261
Abstract:
Judaculla Rock is a mysterious relic that lies at the end of Caney Fork Road in Cullowhee, North Carolina. The rock contains a myriad of ancient markings that the Cherokees believe were carved by Judaculla, god of the hunt. While scientists have searched for a more realistic explanation of its message, Judaculla Rock remains a legend and mystery.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p20-21, por
Record #:
29265
Author(s):
Abstract:
A house called Lafayette is one of the few reminders left in Lenoir County of the time when the British ruled the land and the county was named Dobbs. Built by the Whitfield family before 1790, the house remained mostly vacant for nearly a century. After much vandalism and folklore, Lafayette was renovated and preserved.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p52-53, il, por
Record #:
29263
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, summer fishing is for tourists and fall is the time for fishermen’s fishing. The season usually begins with a mullet blow, a time when the fish become more active due to cooling shallow waters. Also typical of the boom in fall fishing is the well-fed king mackerel, gaining a pound per week in size.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p36-38, il
Record #:
29264
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in western North Carolina, the Uwharries are the oldest mountains on the North American continent. The mountains were first inhabited by the Uwharrie Indians, until gold was discovered and the area attracted more settlers. Today, attractions include the Uwharrie National Forest, Morrow Mountain State Park, and Town Creek Indian Mound.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p44-45, il, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
29262
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a guide to North Carolina’s most notable potteries in the Piedmont, from Seagrove to Robins in lower Randolph and upper Moore Counties. Seven potteries are featured, each using traditional pottery techniques, local clays, and a variety of materials.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p24-25, por, map