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5 results for Psychiatry--Research
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Record #:
26164
Author(s):
Abstract:
Schizophrenia is a complex disorder that remains largely unexplained and difficult to treat. UNC psychiatrists are leading a study to evaluate subjects for severity of psychotic symptoms and side effects from a new generation of medicines.
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Record #:
26178
Abstract:
Psychiatrists are looking for a biological explanation for the bonds between people. Cort Pederson’s research suggests there is one biological system to initiate emotional attachments and another to maintain them. Josephine Johns has found that cocaine interferes with the first one.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Jan 1997, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26208
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the future, testing children’s hormonal levels may allow clinicians to determine whether a child is likely to develop depression or stress-related illness as an adult. With this goal in mind, Linda Noonan, professor of psychiatry, studies rats to learn how physiological and psychological conditions affect brain development.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1991, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26205
Author(s):
Abstract:
The long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse often go unseen. UNC School of Medicine researchers Mark Corrigan and James Garbutt investigate which aspects of childhood sexual abuse, such has early age of onset, most negatively affect psychiatric outcomes in adulthood.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1991, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29260
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Redford Williams, a researcher and professor of psychiatry at Duke Medical School, is studying personality stereotypes to determine the physiological ramifications of stressful behavior patterns. Type A behavior patterns, such as competitiveness and aggression, have been related to increased coronary disease.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p17-18, por