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9 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011
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Record #:
16049
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stickball is the ancestor of lacrosse and has been popular across North America for centuries. In the olden days it was a sometimes violent game and death and injuries were not uncommon. The object of the game was to score a certain number of points in the opponent's goal. The tradition is continued among the modern Cherokees but on a less violent level.
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Record #:
16282
Author(s):
Abstract:
What do all the words in the title have in common? They are official state symbols. Pierce relates how a grassroots movement by Lake Norman Elementary School in Mooresville resulted in the NC General Assembly passing and Governor Beverly Perdue signing a law making stock car racing a state symbol. Why? Many sports played in the state originated elsewhere, but stock car racing has the deepest historical connection to the sport than any other state.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p20-22, il, por
Record #:
16281
Author(s):
Abstract:
For many years North Carolinians had led separate lives in public activities, public schools, and sporting events, based on whether they were white, African American, or Native American. For many Native American communities in Robeson County and elsewhere, segregation in sporting events would end in 1967. Brayboy discusses what basketball was like before integration.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p15-17, il, por
Record #:
16283
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Gastonia, the year 1967 brought an end to school segregation and the merger of historically black Highland High School with all-white Ashley High School. Grundy relates how basketball players from the two schools overcame their differences, worked together, shared skills and ideas, and went on to win the 4A state basketball championship.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p27-28, por
Record #:
16284
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grundy discusses how attitudes and values of a community determined the type of uniforms girls wore while playing basketball.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p29-31, il
Record #:
16279
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carolina League was minor league and only lasted three years, but how it operated worried Major League Baseball. The league attracted top-notch ballplayers by providing stability and steady pay during the Great Depression. What worried the Big League owners was the greater freedom players had as opposed to their players, especially in the reserve clause, which bound a major leaguer to the team who held his contract forever. In other words, this treated the player as a piece of property.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p8-11, por
Record #:
16280
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although college basketball started in North Carolina in 1906, it had to compete with the big sport of football. This began to change in the 1940s with the arrival of two coaches who had never played basketball but who would leave their mark on the sport. They were John McLendon, coach of North Carolina College (now North Carolina Central University) and Everett Case, coach of North Carolina State University.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p12-14, il, por
Record #:
16278
Author(s):
Abstract:
African American baseball in the South during the days of segregation never reached the level of play and organization as that of the larger Northern cities. Still there was a large pool of talent in North Carolina as well as other states. Bayne discusses semi-pro teams and community teams during this period.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p5-7, il, por
Record #:
16048
Abstract:
This timeline lists a sampling of the state's rich sports history from the 1850s to the present.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Fall 2011, p3-4, 8, 11, 14, 17, 26, 32, 34, 37, il, por
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