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3 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 43 Issue 2, Spring 2004
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Record #:
7080
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Abstract:
Trains were a major form of travel in the state in the early 20th-century, but by 1921, North Carolinians owned over 136,000 automobiles. The most popular car was the Model-T, because of its reasonable price and reliability. North Carolina dirt roads, however, often impassable in wet weather. Turner discusses the work of Harriet Berry, whose work in the 1920s led to legislation that created all-weather roads in the state. As the decade closed, another type of transportation emerged -- the airplane.
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Record #:
7078
Abstract:
The decade of the 1920s was a period of change, both social and economic, for North Carolina's citizens. For the first time many people owned cars, radios, and telephones. Women's fashions and hair styles changed; men shaved off their beards. Women received the right to vote. Many people moved from rural areas to cities in search of employment. Textiles, tobacco, and manufacturing were major employers.
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Record #:
7079
Abstract:
The Jim Crow laws were legislative acts passed by Southern state legislatures to separate citizens by race or color. Wadelington discusses areas in North Carolina society affected by these laws, including education, restaurants, and hospitals.
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