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15 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 32 Issue 2, Spring 1993
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Record #:
16191
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During World War I, North Carolinians, including women and children, supported the war effort stateside. Canning clubs were organized to preserve food. The Woodcraft Girls sold food pledge cards and the Campfire Girls volunteered to babysit the children of women who worked or volunteered in plants or at the Red Cross.
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16192
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Beginning on July 23, 1,200 men were sent to open Camp Greene in Charlotte. It took six weeks to construct and at its height 40,000 troops lived at the camp. The camp not only trained troops for combat but improved the economic situation of Charlotte.
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Record #:
36472
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The author gives a quick overview of the war and North Carolina’s participation in it.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p1-2, il, map
Record #:
36478
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The author gives the story of Kiffin Yates Rockwell, of Asheville who was the first American to volunteer for French service in WWI. He was a part of the American Escadrille (squadron of pilots) and was the first member of his unit and the first American pilot to shoot down an enemy plane.
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Record #:
36479
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The author details how North Carolina joined the war effort and how it contributed to the war.
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Record #:
36481
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The author gives a history of the creation of Camp Greene, Charlotte, NC in 1917.
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Record #:
36475
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The author gives the reasons WWI started and how North Carolina felt about the war.
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Record #:
36484
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The author discusses Germans caught on American soil when the War started. They were interned in a camp built around Mountain Park Hotel at Hot Springs, Madison Co., NC.
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Record #:
36489
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The author uses letters from North Carolina soldiers to describe what it was like fighting on the Western Front.
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Record #:
36485
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The author talks about moving soldiers from North Carolina to France on troop ships. He describes their hardships, training and trench warfare.
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Record #:
36487
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The author gives details about the advanced weapons used in WWI and the terrible toll it took on the lives of soldiers in battle.
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Record #:
36490
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The author discusses the poor equipment and untrained medical staff and procedures in trench warfare in WWI.
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Record #:
36496
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The author talks about how the Germans contacted President Woodrow Wilson asking for peace. Gen. John J. Pershing didn’t want an armistice, but wanted a forced surrender and Germany admitting defeat. The author uses the memories of North Carolinians in the war to recall the rumors of peace and the harsh ending of the war.
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Record #:
36492
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The author talks about how the Spanish Flu affected the troops and the entire State of North Carolina in October and November 1918.
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Record #:
36493
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The author talks about the experiences of a Red Cross worker from North Carolina who was assigned to work with children in France in 1917.
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