NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 1987
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4399
Author(s):
Abstract:
In colonial North Carolina over 90 percent of the colonists got their livelihoods from the land. However, they faced problems modern farmers do not. Colonists had no heavy machinery for plowing and clearing the land. There were no fertilizers and pesticides. Wild animals devoured crops. There were no weather forecasters. Still they persevered, raising enough crops and animals to feed themselves and others and producing enough farm and timber products for export to England and the West Indies.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4405
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lacking ready cash, many farmers in the 1880s made credit arrangements with store owners for supplies against the new season's crop. Interest rates were high, and farms could be lost when a crop failed. To combat this situation, farmers organized the North Carolina Farmers' Alliance in 1887 to provide loans and supplies. Unfortunately the Alliance did not have money for financing comparable to the merchants. After peaking at 100,000, membership began to dwindle in 1892, and the Alliance ended shortly thereafter.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4403
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of farmers in antebellum North Carolina, including Paul C. Cameron, preached agriculture reform. They felt farming would not improve until farmers used \"book farming\", experimented with fertilizers, and upgraded their livestock. Between 1840 and 1860, these approaches took hold, and production of cotton, tobacco, rice, and corn increased, as did farm income. Unfortunately the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 destroyed this progress.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4400
Author(s):
Abstract:
For almost sixty years the federal government has been a presence in Western Carolina both as a preserver of the environment and as employer for projects. Counties benefit from money spent by the government and by tourists who are drawn by the government's creations. Among the projects are the Blue Ridge Parkway, Great Smoky Mountains, and Tennessee Valley Authority, whose dams create lakes for recreational use.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4401
Author(s):
Abstract:
Europeans exploring 1580s North Carolina were introduced to many new crops by the coastal Algonquian Indians. Lacking domesticated animals either for work or food, these people depended on their agriculture for much of their food. Hunting brought meat to the table. The two crops that interested the English and that later would become important to North Carolina were corn and tobacco.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4402
Author(s):
Abstract:
James and Nancy Bennitt were yeoman farmers, the largest white farming class in the Old South. The choice of their farm by Civil War Generals Sherman and Johnston as a place to arrange the surrender of Johnston's troops has kept their name and home alive, while thousands of similar farmers slipped into obscurity. Bennett Place State Historic Site outside Durham preserves the historic moment and, through Bennitt's papers, a look at what a yeoman farm was like between 1839 and 1849.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4404
Abstract:
Paul C. Cameron owned one of the state's largest antebellum plantations. It encompassed over 30,000 acres in Orange and three other counties, and used 900 slaves to tend crops and handle livestock. The plantation became so large that it was eventually divided into smaller units of several thousand acres each. One division is now the Stagville State Historic Site. Cameron was the wealthiest man in the state before the Civil War and remained so after the conflict ended.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 1987, p11-13, il, por
Full Text: