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Record #:
4399
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Abstract:
In colonial North Carolina over 90 percent of the colonists got their livelihoods from the land. However, they faced problems modern farmers do not. Colonists had no heavy machinery for plowing and clearing the land. There were no fertilizers and pesticides. Wild animals devoured crops. There were no weather forecasters. Still they persevered, raising enough crops and animals to feed themselves and others and producing enough farm and timber products for export to England and the West Indies.
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Record #:
4405
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Lacking ready cash, many farmers in the 1880s made credit arrangements with store owners for supplies against the new season's crop. Interest rates were high, and farms could be lost when a crop failed. To combat this situation, farmers organized the North Carolina Farmers' Alliance in 1887 to provide loans and supplies. Unfortunately the Alliance did not have money for financing comparable to the merchants. After peaking at 100,000, membership began to dwindle in 1892, and the Alliance ended shortly thereafter.
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Record #:
4402
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James and Nancy Bennitt were yeoman farmers, the largest white farming class in the Old South. The choice of their farm by Civil War Generals Sherman and Johnston as a place to arrange the surrender of Johnston's troops has kept their name and home alive, while thousands of similar farmers slipped into obscurity. Bennett Place State Historic Site outside Durham preserves the historic moment and, through Bennitt's papers, a look at what a yeoman farm was like between 1839 and 1849.
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Record #:
27761
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Abstract:
The effect that climate change will have on North Carolina’s agriculture is explored. Participants and presenters from The Abundance Foundation’s conference share their experiences with the effects of climate change on their farms and production and their research on how climate change could affect the practice of farming in North Carolina. The increase in temperatures, variability of weather, and water supply are the topics of most concern.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 10, March 2013, p14-17 Periodical Website