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11 results for Sea Chest Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977
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Record #:
7582
Abstract:
Rasmus Midgett, a member of the Gull Shore Life Saving Station, was patrolling the beach at nine o'clock on the night of August 18, 1899, when he heard voices calling for help. The barkentine PRISCILLA, which had sailed from Baltimore on August 12, encountered a hurricane near North Carolina. Heavy waves washed the captain's wife, his son, and two crewmen overboard. The hull broke in two, and ten men were clinging to it in pounding waves twenty-five feet from shore. Midgett was three miles from his station--too far to go for help. He went to their assistance and single-handedly rescued all ten men. He was awarded the Gold Medal of Honor for his actions. The medal is the highest award for lifesaving available from the United States government.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p36-39, il, por
Record #:
7575
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although coastal life-saving activities date back to 1848 in New Jersey and New York, the United States Life-Saving Service was not officially established until April 20, 1871. Construction of the first three of eleven life-saving stations on Hatteras Island began in 1874. Stations were usually built five to seven miles apart to insure as much coverage of the beach as possible. The article includes a map which locates the eleven stations and a chart which positions the stations by longitude and latitude.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p3-6, il, map
Record #:
7583
Abstract:
Baxter Miller entered the Life Saving Service in 1890 at the age of seventeen and retired after thirty years service in 1921. During his career he assisted in saving over 300 lives and was awarded two Congressional Medals of Honor for Lifesaving, the Gold Medal and a Silver Medal from the United States government, and a silver watch from the German government for helping in the rescue of their men from the BREWSTER.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p40-44, il, por
Record #:
7578
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before the lifesaving stations were manned fulltime in 1905, they operated on an active season and inactive season. Active meant fulltime operation between September 1 and May 1, and inactive meant the summer months when only the keeper was on duty. This article describes station activities for every day of the week; a beach apparatus drill by the keeper and seven surfmen; beach patrols and tower watches; equipment used for rescues; and surfboats.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p15-19, 22-23, 26-27, il
Record #:
7580
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles T. Williams II was born on Hatteras Island in 1892. When he was 83, he wrote a book about the village of Avon, titled The Kinnakeeter. Williams was never in the lifesaving service, but he hung around the stations as much as he could when he was young. He recounts how the beach patrols and watches worked, riding on beach patrol with his uncle Benjamin Scarborough, and activities about the stations around the turn of the century.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p24-25
Record #:
7579
Abstract:
Ulysses S. “Lish” Midgett was born in Chicamacomico on Hatteras Island. At the age of 91, he is one of the last remaining surfmen of the original United States Lifesaving Service. In this SEA CHEST interview, Midgett recounts his years of service.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p20-21, por
Record #:
7576
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a compilation of the keepers and crews who manned the eleven life-saving stations on Hatteras Island between 1874 and 1914. The stations are Oregon Inlet, Pea Island, New Inlet, Chicamacomico, Gull Shore, Little Kinnakeet, Big Kinnakeet, Cape Hatteras, Creeds Hill, and Durants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p49-62, il, bibl
Record #:
7581
Author(s):
Abstract:
Couch recounts the story of a heroic rescue of the barkentine EPHRAIM WILLIAMS in the rough seas off Cape Hatteras 1889. Station keepers Benjamin B. Dailey, Patrick H. Etheridge, and several surfmen received the Gold Lifesaving Medal for this rescue.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p30-35, il
Record #:
7577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hatteras Island lifesaving stations were two-story buildings. This article discusses how the rooms were used for crew and equipment storage and how the buildings were constructed. Included is a complete set of architectural plans for these buildings.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p7-14, il
Record #:
7585
Abstract:
The children of Urias Gaskins, Isaac Jennette, and Edward Midgett discuss the lives of their parents. Gaskins was the officer in charge of the Cape Hatteras Coast Guard Station at the time of his death. He received the Silver Medal of Honor for assisting in the rescue of the crew of the BREWSTER. Jennette spent his life in the Coast Guard and died while on duty. He also received the Silver Medal of Honor for assisting in the rescue of the crew of the BREWSTER. Midgett served twenty-eight years in the Life Saving Service and died at the age of eighty-three. He was a recipient of the Silver Medal of Honor for the BREWSTER incident.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p46-48, por
Record #:
7584
Abstract:
The German ship Brewster was one of the largest ships to go aground on Diamond Shoals. When the ship, carrying a crew of thirty-three, grounded on November 29, 1909, three lifesaving crews responded. It was impossible for the rescuers to board, because seas were breaking over the ship, yet they managed to rescue the entire crew. Eleven medals of honor were awarded to the rescuers in the incident.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p45