NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Popular Government Vol. 46 Issue 1, Summer 1980
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
18222
Author(s):
Abstract:
Students attending the University of North Carolina were evaluated through pre-admission and post-graduation testing to determine performance. All fifteen campuses in the UNC system participated in this study. Emphasis was placed on comparing achievement on the five campuses with predominately all black students against the other ten campuses attended by primarily white students.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Summer 1980, p17-24
Record #:
18221
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1973, Charlotte focused on improving its city-wide management while not reducing quality of services. A task force was assembled called the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Local Government Productivity Task Force to review municipal operations and determine how to decrease costs. City council was presented with the task force's findings on May 15, 1978 and this report is summarized in this article.
Source:
Record #:
18214
Author(s):
Abstract:
Payroll for government employees constitutes a large budgetary concern. In 1975, the City of Greensboro proposed a new system of determining employee salaries based on quality of performance. Results of this five-year-old program are presented along with the consequences of using a qualitative-based pay scale.
Source:
Record #:
18223
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the early and mid-20th-century, population generally shifted to urban areas. However throughout the 1970s, the trend stalls and rural populations increased at the same rate as urban areas. Though considered a positive demographical change, growing populations in the state's countryside also caused land developers to reexamine land use, planning, and zoning of the rural landscape.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Summer 1980, p28-34
Subject(s):
Record #:
18233
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1970s, Governor Sanford urged members of the General Assembly to open three specialized schools each focusing specifically on the arts, math and science, and the humanities. Only the school of art, located in Winston-Salem, was realized by Governor Sanford. With Governor Hunt in charge, he persuaded the General Assembly of 1977 and 1979 to establish the school of Math and Science to open in Durham at the end of 1980.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Summer 1980, p35-38