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4 results for Our State Vol. 79 Issue 2, July 2011
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Record #:
14315
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In this third of an eight-part series on the Civil War, Gerard discusses the leadership of Zebulon Baird Vance, Colonel of the 26th North Carolina Regiment and the wartime Governor of North Carolina.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 2, July 2011, p46-48, 50-51, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
14314
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Flat Rock, located in Henderson County, is OUR STATE Magazine's featured Tar Heel Town of the Month.
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Record #:
18985
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Few people knew Robert Harrill well. In 1955, he left his Piedmont home and troubled life behind and hitchhiked to Carolina Beach. From there he walked down to Fort Fisher. He was 62 years old. For the following seventeen years he lived in an abandoned World War II artillery bunker in the middle of beaches and marshlands. His was a simpler life. Although he sought the life of a hermit, his fame grew and people visited, sometimes numbering 17,000 a year.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 2, July 2011, p118-120, 122, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
38296
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The highway as North Carolina’s colonists knew it was the primary pathway for many. Covering 700 miles from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to August, Georgia, this road largely traveled by foot played a pivotal role in creating some of the state’s metros and major cities. Commemorating the importance of the Great Wagon Road are items in the Rowan Museum such as a wagon made by John Israel Nissen, descendant of original travelers of the road. A personal sign of the road’s importance is on display at the Knox Farm: the rim of one of The Great Wagon’s wheels. John Knox’s eighth generation descendants can’t attest the rim was on their ancestor’s wagon; they only know it’s always been part of the farm’s landscape.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 2, July 2011, p32-34, 36-37 Periodical Website