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14 results for Our State Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006
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Record #:
7925
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There are a number of harbors along the coast of North Carolina. Jackson describes three of them that have bed and breakfast inns. Each inn has “harbor” as part of its proper name. The inns are The Harborlight Guest House (Cape Carteret); Marsh Harbour Inn (Bald Head Island); and Ocracoke Harbor Inn (Ocracoke).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p38-40, 42, 44, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7926
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The search for the “Best Hot Dog” is never-ending. Brown describes three hot dog stands that he feels are strong contenders for the title. They are The Roast Grill (Raleigh); Jones Café (Clayton); and The Grocery Bag at Flowers General Store (Clayton).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p197-198, 200-201, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7935
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The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry has maintained and preserved a proud tradition of service for 213 years. It was commissioned in 1793, under the Militia Act passed the previous year in Washington's administration. The company has responded with active service to the nation's conflicts from the War of 1812 to World War I. Individual members have served in World War II and every conflict since then. It is recognized as the official state historic military command. The Fayetteville Light Infantry Armory and Museum's collection includes two centuries of well-preserved documents, uniforms, and artifacts, including the coach the Marquis de Lafayette rode in during his visit to his namesake city in 1825.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p84-86, 88, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7927
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Belk, Lowe's, and Food Lion are readily recognized as giants in their respective industries. Years before their customers numbered into the millions and their employees in the tens of thousands these three businesses were small, one-store, family-owned operations struggling to survive the challenges that all new businesses face. Westbrook discusses how each store developed and what each attributes its enormous success to.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p170-172, 174, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7929
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Brevard, county seat of Transylvania County, attracts visitors with its small-town warmth, strong arts scene, and spectacular natural beauty. There are 250 waterfalls located in and around the town. The town mascot is a white squirrel, and Brevard celebrates a White Squirrel Festival annually. The Brevard Music Center attracts serious music students nationwide who study and perform with nationally recognized musicians during the seven-weeks summer season. Baer discusses Brevard's downtown restoration program, the new $7.5 million library, Brevard College, and economic conditions in the town.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p18-20, 22, 24, 26-27, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7934
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Around 150 years ago the longest plank road ever constructed in the world was built between Fayetteville in Cumberland County and the Moravian village of Bethania in Forsyth County. The distance was 129 miles. The Fayetteville and Western Plank Road followed a course originally laid out by Dr. Elisha Mitchell. Hairr recounts the history and construction of the road.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p76-78, 80, 82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7928
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The state operates one of the largest ferry systems in the country. Currently there are seven routes operating with twenty-three ferries and over four hundred employees. The system is second only to the state of Washington's twenty-eight ferry system. An eighth route from Corolla to Currituck is in the planning stages. State ferries carry 2.5 million riders and over one million vehicles in a typical year.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p176-178, 180-181, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7942
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The Piedmont Land Conservancy was founded in 1990 for the purpose of protecting and preserving the biologically rich areas of nine Piedmont counties. The group has around one hundred projects spread across 12,500 protected acres of natural land and farmland. Like The Nature Conservancy, a national nonprofit organization, the PLC is a land trust. Land trusts buy or facilitate the purchase of actual acreage or development rights on acreage to preserve that land's natural or historic value. The PLC focuses on Alamance, Caswell, Forsyth, Guilford, Randolph, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry, and Yadkin Counties.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p90-92, 94, 96-97, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7944
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Albert Coats founded the Institute of Government at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1931. The Institute, now the School of Government, is celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2006. The school serves local and state government officials across the state. Attendance at the school's programs is around 14,000 annually. Besides handling classes and conferences, the school's staff of over one hundred responds to over 100,000 requests for assistance each year and publishes over one hundred books, articles, journals, and bulletins annually.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p120-122, 124, 126, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7943
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Pottery has been a tradition in the Seagrove area dating back to Native Americans and later to the first European settlers who moved there. In 2006, around one hundred potters live, work, and sell their creations in the surrounding four-county region. Foster describes a weekend visit there, starting with a stop at the North Carolina Pottery Center, places to eat and stay, and where the potters are.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p100-102, 104, 106, 108, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7952
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The North Carolina Arts Incubator, located in downtown Siler City, is the brainchild of Leon Tongret, former director of the small business center at Central Carolina Community College. Business incubators were started by the federal government in the 1980s, and today there are over 2,000 nationwide. Only seven are oriented toward the arts. There are over forty business incubators in the state, but Siler City has the only arts one. Among the things an arts incubator does is offer customized work space to artists. With 70,000 square feet in seven buildings, Siler City's incubator is the largest in the nation, with a planned expansion to 250,000 square feet. Pittard describes the project which links together the arts, historic preservation, and economic development.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p134-136, 138, 140-141, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7951
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Furniture manufacturing began in High Point in the late 1880s. The High Point Furniture Manufacturing Company was the first to ship furniture beyond the city, though soon other furniture manufacturers, attracted by a good supply of lumber and a strong regional market for inexpensive furniture, opened for business. High Point hosted the first Southern Regional Market in 1909. From this date, the shows evolved into the International Home Furnishings Market, a semi-annual furniture event.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p128-130, 132, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7953
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Located in Maggie Valley, the Wheels Through Time Museum features vintage hot rods, touring sedans, sleek roadsters, motorcycles, and billboards. The curator is Dale Walksler, who built up his collection over the thirty years he was in the motorcycle business. The original museum was in Mount Vernon, Illinois, for twenty years. Walksler moved it to Maggie Valley four years ago because he was looking for a small town with a stable tourist trade.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p164-166, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7954
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Milling discusses the work and creations of Asheville glass carver Charles Donaldson. Donaldson spent fifteen years, beginning at age nineteen, traveling the world conducting studies of various cultures' arts and crafts. Seeking a nicer place to raise children, the family left California and settled first in Wilmington and, in 2001, in Asheville. Donaldson produces between sixty and eighty pieces a month. Many are shipped to galleries for sale. He does about twelve craft shows a year. One of the most popular pieces he sells is titled THE BRIDGE.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p188-190, il Periodical Website
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