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16 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006
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Record #:
7774
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Smithfield has sat at a crossroads for its 200-year history. Transportation systems determined much of its success. First came a ferryboat and public house, then the railroad, and finally an interstate highway. Tobacco and cotton fueled the economy at one time, but as they declined, successful pork and sweet potato industries replaced them. The town's attractions include a new museum dedicated to the late movie star Ava Gardner, who grew up there; a reviving Neuse River waterfront; and shopping destinations along Interstate 95, including Carolina Premium Outlets.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p18-20, 22-25, il, map Periodical Website
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7775
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In the late 19th-century, George Vanderbilt purchased 100,000 acres in western North Carolina near Asheville and had a 250-room mansion constructed. He envisioned an Old World estate that could produce enough vegetables, fruits, and meats to support its working population. Chase discusses the foods available and what the family dined on. While food served at glittering banquets included Lobster Newberg and Consommé Royale, the family, when alone, generally dined on the simple, wholesome foods that sustained farm families around the state at the close of the 19th-century.
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7772
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Few things go together better than the beach and a good book. North Carolina has an abundance of good coastal bookstores, each with a character all its own. Blackburn profiles a few of them including the Island Bookstore (Duck and Corolla); Buxton Village Books (Buxton); Manteo Booksellers (Manteo); Quarter Moon Books & Gifts (Topsail Beach); Dee Gee's Gifts & Books (Morehead City); and Lowell's Bookworm (Holden Beach).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p174-176, 178, 180, 182, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7793
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The North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores has been closed to the public for nearly three years. During that time, the $25 million expansion has tripled its space and increased the full-time staff from fourteen to forty. The planned date for reopening is May 19, 2006. During the closure, many of the animals were given away or loaned to other aquariums, science centers, and teaching facilities. The aquarium will be stocked with 3,000 aquatic animals, including jellyfish, river otters, tiger sharks, sea nettles, and triggerfish. A highlight of the Living Shipwreck exhibit will be a replica of the German submarine U-352, which was sunk off North Carolina in 1942 by the U.S. Coast Guard cutter ICARUS.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p146-148, 150, 152-154, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7791
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The Roanoke Island Festival Park has two very special venues of North Carolina heritage -- the Adventure Museum and the Outer Banks History Center. The Adventure Museum is a facility designed to provide a hands-on experience for visitors and is set up in chronological order so people can explore the 400 years of Outer Banks history. The museum targets school children in fourth and eighth grade history classes. Students can meet a pirate, dress up in Elizabethan clothing, and learn navigation with 16th-century tools. The North Carolina State Archives administers the Outer Banks History Center that collects and preserves the history and culture of the North Carolina coast. Among the holdings are historian David Stick's extensive collection of Outer Banks' materials, maps, and oral histories.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p118-120, 122, 124-125, il Periodical Website
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7790
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North Carolina's coast remained sparsely populated until the mid-20th-century. The attraction with the coast began with the influx of people during World War II. After hostilities ceased, a building boom began with high-rise hotels, condominium towers, strip malls, and beach houses crowding into environmentally delicate areas. The North Carolina Coastal Federation, organized in 1982, is a nonprofit organization that has a simple mission--protect the coast. La Vere discusses the NCCF's three-pronged strategy for coastal protection and the work of the state's three coastkeepers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p110-112, 114, 116, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7788
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Some graveyards in Davidson County contain unique, pierced tombstones carved by 19th-century German cabinetmakers and designs include the fylfot cross, tulip, compass stars, hearts, and tree-of-life and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Churchyards containing carved tombstones include Bethany United Church of Christ and Abbott's Creek Primitive Baptist Church.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p50-52, 54, 56-57, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7789
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The Sanderling Resort & Spa in northern Dare County opened in 1985 and is a showcase for nationally acclaimed wildlife sculpture artists. The Sanderling contains the largest private collection of works by Grainger McKoy, a set of eighteen original Audubon prints, and a collection of Doughty Birds created in porcelain by English artist Dorothy Doughty.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p102-104, 106, 108, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7787
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There are a number of castles, some complete with medieval-style battlements and fanciful towers, across the state. These include Castle McCulloch (Jamestown); Gimghoul Castle (Chapel Hill); Castle Mont Rouge (Durham); Graylyn (Winston-Salem); Elon Castle (Greensboro); and Homewood (Asheville).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p38-40, 42, 44-47, il Periodical Website
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7792
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North Carolina's first light tower stood on a lonely sandbar between Core Banks and Ocracoke Island to guide sailors through the ever-shifting channel of Ocracoke Inlet.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p128-130, 132, 134, map Periodical Website
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7796
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The plight of bald eagles, manatees, and whales is well-known, but how many individuals know of endangered species like the Tunis sheep, Milking Devon, Tamworth hogs, or Pineywoods cattle. These are farm animals that were once staples of small family farms for hundreds of years. Some of them, like the Pineywoods cattle, were brought to America by Spaniards in the 1500s. Several breeds of American livestock have disappeared altogether. Farlow discusses the work of the American Breeds Livestock Conservancy. The group organized in Vermont in 1977 and later relocated to Pittsboro in 1985. The organization works to preserve the once-thriving animals for future generations. ALBC has three goals: research rare breeds, provide assistance to farmers and livestock breeders, and educate the public about these disappearing animals.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p186-188, 190, 192, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7802
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Rockingham County and its county seat, Wentworth, are named for the second Marquess of Rockingham, Charles Watson Wentworth. Although British, he was very popular among the colonists for securing the repeal of the Stamp Act. Tobacco was a major economic force in the county at one time, with the American Tobacco Company as the largest employer. Visitors can find many activities in a number of small county towns, including antique shopping and a new proposed equestrian center in Reidsville, arts and crafts in Madison, and outfitting companies in Eden and Madison that market the county's river recreation. A number of festivals celebrate the community in the spring and summer and include a folk festival, pottery festival, and the Charlie Poole Music Festival.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p226-228, 230, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7801
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Milling discusses the work and creations of Debbie Littledeer, a graduate of Mars Hill College, who creates silkscreens that feature Appalachian scenes--Blue Ridge Mountains, wildlife, trees, and flowers. Littledeer uses up to eighteen different colors in her limited edition prints, but blue and lavender are preferred. Milling describes the process for making a silkscreen.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p220-222, 224, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7795
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Mrs. Jessie Stevens Taylor served as Southport's volunteer weather observer and storm warning display woman from 1900 to 1961.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p166-168, 170, 172, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7794
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Seldon profiles Silver Coast Winery, located at Ocean Isle Beach and owned by Southport orthopedic surgeon Dr. “Bud” Azzato and his wife Maryann Charlap Azzato.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p156-158, 160, 162, il Periodical Website
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