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12 results for Our State Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002
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Record #:
5361
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Blind at birth, Robbinsville native Ronnie Milsap overcame adversity to rise to the top of the music field, with awards including a Grammy, Billboard, Cashbox, Country Music Entertainer of the Year, Male Vocalist of the Year, and Album of the Year. In 2002, Milsap will receive the American Foundation for the Blind's Helen Keller Achievement Award for his overall achievement level.
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5360
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Winston-Salem native George Hamilton IV has performed around the world for nearly fifty years. He was on his way to becoming a pop star but gave it up for his real love, country music. He is a member of the Grand Old Opry in Nashville and has received many music awards.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002, p78-82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
5359
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Ashby Frank of Lexington is a mandolin prodigy. Still a teenager, he has won top honors in several mandolin competitions, including the Galax, Virginia Old Fiddler's Competition in 1997 and 1999, as well as the one at the 1999 MerleFest. He has also released a critically acclaimed CD and toured nationally and internationally.
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5364
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Ten years before the outbreak of World War II, Charlotte was a town where many country and bluegrass musicians performed and perfected their styles before Nashville became \"the\" place to be. Davis discusses some of these musicians, including Charlie and Bill Monroe.
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5363
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James Taylor's fame as a singer/songwriter is worldwide. In North Carolina his roots stretch back to Scottish immigrants in 1790 New Bern. Comer profiles the career of this musician whose song \"Carolina on My Mind\" has become \"the unofficial anthem of the state.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002, p40-44, il, por Periodical Website
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5358
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The Red Clay Ramblers, the state's celebrated mountain-and-roots string band, is marking thirty years of performing in 2002. Simpson, one of the band's original members, discusses the musical group's successes, performing, and fellowship over that interval.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002, p60-62, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
5362
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Ahuja describes how to spend a perfect weekend on and around Lake Norman, the state's largest man-made lake, covering 32,500 acres and having 520 miles of shoreline. He discusses eateries and water activities.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002, p134-138, il Periodical Website
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5365
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Comer examines the lives of the Trantham family of Haywood County and the Cockman family of Catawba County, two families who are carrying their music, stories, and traditions into the twenty-first century.
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5399
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Shirley Caesar is the first lady of gospel music, having won 11 Grammy, 19 Dove, and 13 Stellar Awards, as well as being inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame 20 years ago. A former Durham city councilwoman, Cesar is minister of a Raleigh Pentecostal Church and also finds time to perform two or three concerts around the country 45 weekends out of the year. At age 63 she shows no sign of slowing down.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002, p102-103, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
5398
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The state has the largest black bear population in the southeastern states, with over 9,000 of these animals in 55 counties from the mountains to the coastal plain. Bear sanctuaries in the state cover 600,000 acres, the largest such program in the nation.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 2, July 2002, p116-119, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5470
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Gospel music - Southern, black, contemporary, and inspirational - is very popular across the state. However, at the moment, there is no place to document this gospel heritage. Enter Dennis Sparks, Eddie Albert, and Claude Hopper of Rockingham County. The three purchased the closed 500,000-square-foot Mayodan Cotton Mill and plan to turn it into the North Carolina Gospel Music Hall of Fame.
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Record #:
5497
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Fontana Village in Graham County is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. Comer discusses the history of the town, the building of the dam, and the town's popularity as a tourist destination.
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