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7 results for Our State Vol. 67 Issue 3, Aug 1999
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Record #:
4207
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North Carolina's Paul Revere was Col. Alexander Mebane. Captured by Tory Colonel David Fanning, Mebane escaped the night of September 12, 1781, and rode through Orange and Alamance Counties to warn the patriots of the Tories' approach. On September 13, Tories and patriots fought at Lindley's Mill, with neither side achieving victory. After the war Mebane's activities included serving in the U.S. Congress, as a member of the Constitutional Convention, and as an original trustee of the University of North Carolina.
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4206
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Holly Springs in Wake County had known success from its earliest days. By 1900, it had a reputation for education and commerce. By 1983, progress had passed it by, and the 700 citizens were faced with merging with another town or trying to revitalize theirs. They chose the latter; voted for bonds; and built the first sewer plant. That brought developers. In nine years the population rose to 7,000. The tax base went from $23 million to $500,000 million, and land prices tripled.
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4212
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Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve, located near Southern Pines, is a 676-acre longleaf pine forest. Originally part of land purchased by James Boyd in the early 1900s, the preserve became the first natural area in the state park system in 1963 when the widow of Boyd's grandson donated it. Today Weymouth Woods is used for environmental education, resource management, and trail-hiking.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 3, Aug 1999, p54-55, 57, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4210
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Built by Josiah Collins in the late 1700s, Somerset Place was one of the state's most prosperous plantations in pre-Civil War days. Debt and the Civil War began its downward spiral. In 1889, it was sold out of the family, passing through numerous owners until acquired by the state in 1939. Now almost restored, it is a State Historic Site.
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4208
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In North America emeralds of gem-quality are found only in our state. Among emerald hunters James Hill, Jr., of Hiddenite, is one of the most successful. Though gem hunting has left him $200,000 in debt and possibly cost him two marriages, Hill is digging up emeralds that geologists say are among the finest in the world.
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4209
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From May to November king mackerel tournaments are big business along the state's coast. While events like Southport's U.S. Open King Mackerel Tournament and the Wrightsville Beach King Mackerel Tournament award large prizes, they also benefit local economies. Motels, restaurants, bait and tackle shops, and shops in general benefit. The Atlantic Beach Tournament brings $1.6 million into the local economy.
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4213
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The Carolina Coal Mine, located in the village of Coal Glen in Chatham County, was the scene of the worst mining disaster in the state's history. On May 27, 1925, three explosions rocked the mine and killed fifty-three men, half the adult male population of the town. An improperly set dynamite blast was the cause. The mine closed during the Depression, reopened in 1947, and closed for good in 1953.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 3, Aug 1999, p70, 72, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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